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Certain project planning tools should be part of every competitive grant proposal writer’s repertoire. Among such tools are: RASCI charts, Gantt charts, SWOT analysis, PESTLE analysis, Red Team reviews, meta-analysis, and logic models. This post discusses RASCI charts.

 

Definition of RASCI Charts

 

A RASCI chart is a form of responsibility matrix. It clarifies roles and responsibilities for tasks and deliverables within a project team. It specifies who will do what. A RASCI chart encompasses all of the primary types of stakeholders in a project. It aids in mapping project implementation plans, personnel plans, and evaluation plans. It also aids in doing a task analysis for a Gantt chart and in developing project-specific position descriptions.

 

R = Responsible. R is the one person who will be ultimately responsible for success in completing a task and in delivering its work products. R may be the person who actually will do the work (or produce the deliverable) or who will direct others to do the work. Example: Strategic Communication Specialist.

 

A = Accountable. A is the one person who will have ultimate accountability and authority for the task. A is also the person to whom R will report or will be otherwise accountable, and A is the person who will approve the adequacy of the work product (deliverable). Example: Project Director.

 

S = Supportive. S is the person or team of persons who will be needed to do the actual work of completing specific tasks (or creating specific deliverables). S often includes persons who can provide logistical, coordinative, or administrative services. Example: Professional Development Coordinator.

 

C = Consulted. C is anyone whose input will add value and/or whose buy-in will be essential for the ultimate implementation of the tasks. C commonly includes persons who can offer technical expertise to a task. Example: Community-Based Organizations.

 

I = Informed. I is the person or groups of persons who will need to be notified of results or actions taken but who will not need to be involved in daily decision-making processes. I will include persons or groups that will need to be “kept in the loop” and/or apprised of the status and progress of a project. Example: Board of Directors.

 

Steps in Creating a RASCI Chart

 

A RASCI chart requires the prior completion of at least a preliminary task analysis for a project. After completing a task analysis, create a table. List the Tasks down the Y-axis. List the Positions or Persons along the X-axis. Enter the roles in the cells. Color-code each type of role (if desired). The relative numbers of stakeholders by code should be: I > C > S > R > A. Every task must have an A and an R. Not every task needs an S.

 

Sample RASCI Chart

 

  Person 1 Person 2 Person 3 Person 4… Person N
Activity/Task 1 R I A C S
Activity/Task 2 I R A S C
Activity/Task 3 R C A I S
Activity/Task 4 S A C R I

 

Among the uses of a RASCI chart in writing a grant proposal are:

  1. Program Design – describing action steps that R, A, S, C, and/or I will perform
  2. Personnel Plan – identifying types of personnel required to implement a project
  3. Evaluation Plan – identifying types of personnel needed for interim and final evaluation of a project
  4. Budget – allocating funds for key personnel identified through creating a RASCI chart

 

Among the limitations of using a RASCI chart in writing a grant proposal are:

  1. Possible proliferation of A when only one person should be A
  2. Interpretations that R are not A to any degree at all
  3. Possible proliferation of C where too many C may slow progress of project

 

Subsequent posts will discuss other project development tools such as Gantt charts, SWOT analysis, PESTLE analysis, Red Team reviews, meta-analysis, and logic models.

 

See also: https://grantresults.wordpress.com/tag/rasci-charts

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Project management and staffing plans are critical elements in many competitive proposals. Using a RASCI Chart is one way to fine-tune project planning and subsequently improve implementation.

 

Defining a RASCI Chart:

For every step in planning a project or initiative, it helps grant seekers to define who will be responsible (R), who will be accountable (A), who will be supportive (S), who will be consulted (C), and who will be informed (I):

 

R = Responsible: R is the person who will be ultimately responsible for successfully completing and delivering the activity and/or task. R may be the person who actually will do the work (or produce the deliverable) or who will direct others to do the work.

 

A = Accountable: A is the person who will have ultimate accountability and authority for the activity or task; A is also the person to whom R will report or will be otherwise accountable, and A is the person who will approve the adequacy of the work (deliverable).

 

S = Supportive: S is the person or team of persons who will be needed to do the actual work of completing specific tasks (or creating specific deliverables). S often includes persons who can provide coordinative or administrative services or who can assist with logistics.

 

C = Consulted: C is anyone whose input will add value and/or whose buy-in will be essential for ultimate implementation of the activities or tasks. C commonly includes persons who can offer technical expertise to an activity or task.

 

I = Informed: I is the person or groups of persons who will need to be notified of results or actions taken but who will not need to be involved in daily decision-making processes. I will include persons or groups that will need to be “kept in the loop” and/or apprised of the status and progress of a project or initiative.

 

How to Create a RASCI Chart:

  1. Introduce and/or review the RASCI definitions with the team or work group so that everyone will understand what each role encompasses.
  2. Identify and list in a vertical sequence each core activity or task that will be involved in a project or initiative down the leftmost column of a chart or spreadsheet. Strive to be as complete as possible.
  3. Identify all of the persons and/or roles that will be involved in a project or initiative and list them horizontally as column headings across the top of a chart or spreadsheet.
  4. Identify the R, A, S, C, and I for each core activity or task along the leftmost column.
  5. Review and discuss any gaps or overlaps in the plan of work. A gap will exist whenever an R is not specified for a core activity or task. An overlap will exist whenever there are two or more R for any given core activity or task. One way to resolve overlaps is to analyze the identified activity or task into further sub-tasks.
  6. Be aware that at times some activities or tasks may not require every letter of the RASCI model.
  7. If it seems likely to be helpful, share the draft RASCI Chart with the entire work group or team as well as with a broader group.
  8. Modify the RASCI Chart based on feedback, adopt it, and then launch the project or initiative.
  9. Use the RASCI Chart as a guide during implementation, but expect to need to adjust it as the project or initiative discovers oversights or omissions and learns what works and what does not work.

 

  Person 1 Person 2 Person 3 Person 4… Person N
Activity or Task 1 R I A C S
Activity or Task 2 I R A S C
Activity or Task 3… R C A I S
Activity or Task N S A C R I

 

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