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This is the last of three posts on using foundation directories in prospect research. It covers: trustees/directors, financial data, and selected grants.

 

Directories Graphic 3

 

Trustees/Directors

 

Sometimes, as popular wisdom has it, it’s not what you know it’s whom you know. If someone connected to an applicant organization (e.g., an executive director or a member of a board of directors) knows personally someone connected to a foundation (e.g., a director or a trustee), it may improve the applicant’s odds of getting a grant.

 

A well-placed connection on a foundation’s board of directors may be willing to advocate on behalf of a grant for a specific applicant. If not actual advocacy, the same connection may be willing to share deeper insights into what the foundation’s decision-makers favor in a grant proposal. Although the absence of a well-placed advocate is not a reason to forgo a grant opportunity, its presence can prove helpful.

 

Financial Data

 

Smaller foundations tend to have lesser financial assets and to award fewer grants than larger ones. They also tend to award smaller amounts in each grant or to award grants only to pre-selected (or invited) applicants.

 

No matter who does the work, preparing a proposal costs an applicant time and money. It may get a greater return on its investment if it seeks a single grant of $50,000 rather than using the same proposal to seek ten grants each for a tenth as much. However, if all an applicant needs is a grant of $5,000, it should not request one for $50,000.

 

Selected Grants

 

Entries in a foundation directory may list sample recent grant awards. Such lists seldom present every grant award a foundation has made in a recent year.

 

Look at the amounts awarded and the nature of the recipients. If at least one recipient is similar to the applicant and if the amounts are similar to what the applicant needs, then add the funder to a list of possible grant makers. Look up the funder’s website and/or at its annual 990-PF or 990 filings. Both places will list every grant it made in a given reporting period and will confirm (or disconfirm) the foundation as a possible funder.

 

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This is the second of three posts on using foundation directories in prospect research. It covers: deadlines, purposes and activities, and fields of interest.

 

Directories Graphic 2

 

Deadlines

 

Some foundations award grants yearly, others semi-yearly, others quarterly, and still others on a rolling basis. Semi-yearly means there are two opportunities to apply per year; quarterly means there are four. A rolling basis means there is no fixed deadline and applications can be submitted at virtually any time.

 

In some cases, foundations use two-step deadlines: one for a pre-proposal (or a letter of inquiry or a concept paper) and a later one for a full proposal (if invited). Only if a pre-proposal is persuasive will a subsequent full proposal be invited.

 

Grant award notices may lag a month or longer after a board meeting where proposals are reviewed and grant awards are approved. After a proposal is rejected, an applicant may need to wait a year before it submits another; if its proposal is funded, it may need to wait two years.

 

Purposes and Activities

 

A specific foundation may have many purposes or few; it also may fund many types of activities or few. A corporate charitable giving program may favor opportunities for its personnel to volunteer in the community and to enhance public awareness of its brand by product donations; it will not fund the purchase of similar products made by other companies. Foundations may fund activities, but not paid labor (usually termed personnel).

 

These varied grantor-specific funding purposes and allowable activities constrain the options available to potential applicants. A poor match here is not a match worth pursuing.

 

Fields of Interest

 

A specific foundation or corporate charity may have many fields of interest or few. It may fund strictly within its proclaimed interests or it may also stray outside them from time to time. Directories list fields of interest only n general terms. By studying a funder’s recent grant making history, an applicant may verify what the declared interests may mean for its specific prospects.

 

 

Grant seekers use the grant maker profiles found in foundation directories to sort out strong leads from weak ones. This is the first of three posts on using foundation directories in prospect research. It covers: physical location, websites, limitations, types of grant makers, and 990-PF forms.

 

Directories Graphic 1

 

Physical Location

 

In general, the more distant a private foundation is from a grant seeker the less likely it is to award a grant. Its address on a map is merely a first small clue in the search for potential funders. A local grant maker often is somewhat more familiar with local needs (or problems) and local priorities. Its directors and benefactors often also have resolved to try to meet (or solve) them. Thus, there is good reason to look locally first, but that by itself is no reason not to look farther afield later.

 

Websites

 

The contents of a foundation website are often much more current and more extensive than those of even the best print or online directory. A grant seeker can search a funder’s website to verify or qualify the information it finds there. It is often possible to use a foundation’s website to confirm deadlines, retrieve application forms and instructions, review grant history, identify current directors and trustees, and do other tasks helpful in doing prospect research and preparing grant applications.

 

Limitations

 

A limitation is a restriction on grant making. As a pre-condition, it shrinks the pool of applicants. A limitation may have to do with where, or what, or for what, or how many, or when, or how often, or how, or any other aspect of seeking a grant from a given funder. Often limitations pertain to geography, or purposes, or activities. If an applicant falls within – or sometimes, outside – the scope of one or more limitations it may need to look elsewhere for funding.

 

Types of Grant Makers

 

The type of grant maker (e.g., community foundation, family foundation, corporate charitable giving program) impacts the entire solicitation process and the likelihood of funding. In a corporate charity, for example, decision-making will follow different paths and obey different logics than in the foundations. A corporate charity may donate labor and products, not actual cash grants. A family foundation may make less predictable funding decisions than a corporate one. A non-family independent foundation may require a more rigorous evaluation plan than a family one. And a community foundation may gather and manage very distinct grant programs under its roof.

 

990-PF Forms

 

The 990-PF is a yearly financial statement that private foundations file with the United States Internal Revenue Service (IRS). The more recent the year of the form on file the more it should reflect the foundation’s present priorities and practices. Comparisons of several years of filings may disclose patterns and trends in grant making.

 

On each year’s filing, look for the ranges and amounts of grant awards. Look also at the types and locations of applicants winning them. How to analyze a 990-PF is an art in itself, one in which the Foundation Center offers some basic assistance.

 

Only private foundations must file the 990-PF. Grant-making public charities and community foundations file Form 990 in the same manner as other non-profit organizations. Corporate charitable giving programs do not file yearly reports with the IRS.

 

Compared to their counterparts in the fifty states, nonprofits and other grant seekers operating in the United States Virgin Islands (USVI) appear to have limited options among local grant makers.

 

This post explores private foundations as grant makers in the USVI. Later posts will explore grant makers and grant making in other parts of the world.

 

Foundations in the US Virgin Islands:

The Community Foundation of the Virgin Islands publishes a Community Services Directory, which is available online as a free PDF file. Among the many providers of community services active in the United States Virgin Islands (USVI), the Directory identifies 18 foundations. Its contents describe each foundation’s purposes, programs, and types of support, and they provide detailed contact information, as well as websites (where available).

 

Of the foundations described in the Directory:

  • 16 are based in the USVI, two in Florida
  • Seven make grants, three award scholarships, and six make donations
  • Four make neither grants nor donations

 

Foundation Name Location Type of Support
Bennie and Martha Benjamin Foundation Florida Scholarships and grants
Beyond Visions Foundation St. Thomas USVI Grants
Community Foundation of the Virgin Islands St. Thomas USVI Scholarships and grants
Governor Juan F. Luis Hospital Foundation St. Croix USVI Grants
History, Culture, and Tradition Foundation, Inc. St. Croix USVI No grants. No donations.
Island Resources Foundation St. Thomas USVI Donations only.
Miracle Babies Support Foundation St. Thomas USVI No grants
Make a Wish Foundation – VI Chapter Florida Grants
Partners for Health St. Thomas USVI Donations only.
Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation St. Thomas USVI Donations only.
St. Croix Foundation for Community Development St. Croix USVI Grants
St. Croix Tennis Foundation St. Croix USVI No grants. No donations.
St. John Community Foundation St. John USVI Grants and scholarships
Sunshine Foundation St. Croix USVI No grants. No donations.
Tillett Foundation, Inc. St. Thomas USVI Donations only.
USVI Coalition for Sustainable Economic Development, Inc. St. Croix USVI No grants. No donations.
United Way of St. Croix St. Croix USVI Donations only.
United Way of St. Thomas/St. John St. Thomas USVI Donations only.

 

If visitors to this blog know of other foundations operating or making grants in the United States Virgin Islands, please post a comment here with their names and locations.

Charitable donations and grant making are activities by no means limited to organizations operating only within the United States of America. They occur in many parts of the world, wherever one finds corporations and foundations committed to philanthropic undertakings.

 

This post explores the distribution of grant-making foundations in Canada. A later post will explore the distribution of corporate giving programs in Canada. In addition, further posts will explore grant-related philanthropies elsewhere in North America — as well as in other countries and regions of the world.

 

Canadian Grant-Making Foundations:

Based on a list at Charity Village, at least 283 private foundations make grants within Canada. Charity Village’s database briefly describes the purposes and geographic focuses of each foundation and provides links to their individual websites.

 

Of the 283 foundations, 19 are international, 90 are national, and 65 are regional. Most of the international foundations are based in the United States of America. The regional foundations provide support either in parts of two or more provinces or in their entireties.

 

In addition, 109 of the 283 foundations provide support within specific provinces: 20 in Alberta (AB), 20 in British Columbia (BC), nine in Manitoba (MB), three in New Brunswick (NB), one in Newfoundland (NL), three in Nova Scotia (NS), one in Northwest Territories (NT), 44 in Ontario (ON), five in Quebec (QC), two in Prince Edward Island (PE), and one in Saskatchewan (SK).

 

Yukon (YT) and Nunavut (NU) have no province-specific foundations listed on Charity Village’s online directory. Applicants in these sparsely settled provinces must look outside provincial boundaries in their pursuit of grants from private foundations.

 

Canadian Grant-Making Private Foundations

Location

Number

Location

Number

Location

Number

International

19

New Brunswick

3

Ontario

44

National

90

Newfoundland

1

Quebec

5

Regional

65

Northwest Territories

1

Prince Edward Island

2

Alberta

20

Nova Scotia

3

Saskatchewan

1

British Columbia

20

Nunavut

0

Yukon

0

Manitoba

9

 

There may be some cause for optimism for nonprofits and other grant seekers in 2013. The reason why is that sustained trends in the numbers of grant-making private foundations should translate readily into increases in the numbers of grant opportunities available to grant seekers.

 

Growth in Numbers of Private Foundations:

Data from National Center for Charitable Statistics (NCCS) indicate that, state-by-state, the numbers of private foundations increased substantially, but unevenly, during the period. The NCCS data discussed here are for 501(c)(3) non-operating private foundations only.

 

Analysis of the NCCS data reveals that:

  • In 27 states, growth rates were more than 50%
  • In 3 states, growth rates were more than 100%: Delaware, North Carolina, and Rhode Island
  • In 3 states, growth rates were less than 20%: Indiana, Iowa, and North Dakota; Washington, DC also had a growth rate of less than 20%
  • Growth rates ranged from 13.8% in Iowa to 247.4% in Delaware
  • The median growth rate was 51.8% (in both Nebraska and Maine)

 

Overall, the strongest rates of growth in the numbers of grant-making 501(c)(3) private foundations during the period, 1999-2009, were in the South and the Southwest.

 

Mid-Atlantic:

In the Mid-Atlantic States, growth in the numbers of grant-making 501(c)(3) private foundations ranged from 19.4% in Washington, DC to 247.4% in Delaware.

 

State

Rate

State

Rate

State

Rate

Delaware (DE)

247.4%

New Jersey (NJ)

67.7%

Pennsylvania (PA)

41.3%

District of Columbia (DC)

19.4%

New York (NY)

34.8%

West Virginia (WV)

57.7%

Maryland (MD)

54.8%

 

 

 

North Central:

In the North Central States, growth in the numbers of grant-making 501(c)(3) private foundations during 1999-2009 ranged from 17.9% in Indiana to 70.9% in Wisconsin.

 

State

Rate

State

Rate

State

Rate

Illinois (IL)

36.2%

Kentucky (KY)

44.8%

Ohio (OH)

39.7%

Indiana (IN)

17.9%

Michigan (MI)

45.6%

Wisconsin (WI)

70.9%

 

Great Plains:

In the Great Plains States, growth in the numbers of grant-making 501(c)(3) private foundations ranged from 13.8% in Iowa to 51.8% in Nebraska.

 

State

Rate

State

Rate

State

Rate

Iowa (IA)

13.8%

Missouri (MO)

30.2%

Oklahoma (OK)

45.4%

Kansas (KS)

34.3%

Nebraska (NE)

51.8%

South Dakota (SD)

30.2%

Minnesota (MN)

40.2%

North Dakota (ND)

14.3%

 

 

New England:

In the New England States, growth in the numbers of grant-making 501(c)(3) private foundations ranged from 29.4% in New Hampshire to 113.3% in Rhode Island.

 

State

Rate

State

Rate

State

Rate

Connecticut (CT)

49.6%

Massachusetts (MA)

31.4%

Rhode Island (RI)

113.3%

Maine (ME)

51.8%

New Hampshire (NH)

29.4%

Vermont (VT)

54.6%

 

South:

In the Southern States, growth in the numbers of grant-making 501(c)(3) private foundations ranged from 42.0% in Tennessee to 119.1% in North Carolina.

 

State

Rate

State

Rate

State

Rate

Alabama (AL)

 56.4%

Louisiana (LA)

60.0%

South Carolina (SC)

69.4%

Arkansas (AR)

52.9%

Mississippi (MS)

59.2%

Tennessee (TN)

42.0%

Florida (FL)

95.7%

North Carolina (NC)

119.1%

Virginia (VA)

58.2%

Georgia (GA)

69.9%

 

 

 

Northwest:

In the Northwestern States, growth in the numbers of grant-making 501(c)(3) private foundations ranged from 34.2% in Alaska to 57.0% in Washington.

 

State

Rate

State

Rate

State

Rate

Alaska (AK)

34.2%

Montana (MN)

47.7%

Washington (WA)

57.0%

Idaho (ID)

42.9%

Oregon (OR)

40.5%

Wyoming (WY)

46.1%

 

Southwest:

In the Southwestern States, growth in the numbers of grant-making 501(c)(3) private foundations ranged from 52.3% in Colorado to 93.1% in Arizona.

 

State

Rate

State

Rate

State

Rate

Arizona (AZ)

93.1%

Hawaii (HI)

53.4%

Texas (TX)

67.1%

California (CA)

67.2%

Nevada (NV)

75.1%

Utah (UT)

61.2%

Colorado (CO)

52.3%

New Mexico (NM)

60.9%

 

 

Directories are great tools for finding new funding sources. Nonprofits and other grant seekers can find state and local foundation directories for 41 of the 50 states and for Washington, DC. As of late 2012, the nine states that do not have current or recent state-specific foundation directories are: Arkansas (AR), California (CA), Hawaii (HI), Mississippi (MS), New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), North Carolina (NC), Rhode Island (RI), and West Virginia (WV).

 

The directories vary greatly in their coverage and content. Some are available in multiple formats; most, in one only. Out of 73 identified directories, 8 are PDF files, 19 are CD-ROMs, 29 are print compilations, and 17 are online databases.

 

This post covers the New England States of Connecticut (CT), Maine (ME), Massachusetts (MA), New Hampshire (NH), Rhode Island (RI,) and Vermont (VT). It is the last post in the series. Earlier posts have covered other regions in the United States of America.

 

The New England States:

CONNECTICUT

Connecticut Grantmakers Online. Hartford, CT: Connecticut Council for Philanthropy, 2012. This subscription-based, online database profiles more than 2,200 grant-making foundations and corporations either located in Connecticut or giving in Connecticut.

 

Directory of Community Foundations Serving Connecticut. Hartford, CT: Connecticut Council for Philanthropy, 2012. This free online directory provides extensive contact information for 18 community foundations giving in Connecticut.

 

MAINE

Directory of Maine Grantmakers. 8th Ed. Portland, ME: Maine Philanthropy Center, 2011. This print and subscription-based online directory profiles more than 475 foundations and corporations either located in Maine or giving in Maine.

 

MASSACHUSETTS

Grant Makers Directory. Boston, MA: Associated Grant Makers, 2011. This online database describes more than 300 grant makers in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and New Hampshire.

 

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Directory of Charitable Funds in New Hampshire. Concord, NH: New Hampshire Department of Justice, Office of the Attorney General, 2012. This free PDF file, available online, lists more than 400 grant-making organizations registered with the New Hampshire Office of the Attorney General and having assets of more than $25,000. A notice at CPG Fundraising indicates that it no longer publishes The Directory of New Hampshire Foundations.

 

RHODE ISLAND

Rhode Island has no state directory of grant makers.

 

VERMONT

Vermont Directory of Foundations. Middlebury VT and New York, NY: The Vermont Community Foundation and the Foundation Center, 2009.  This free print and online directory profiles 334 grant-making foundations located in Vermont and 287 other foundations located elsewhere but giving in Vermont.

Directories are great tools for finding new funding sources. Nonprofits and other grant seekers can find state and local foundation directories for 41 of the 50 states and for Washington, DC. As of late 2012, the nine states that do not have current or recent state-specific foundation directories are: Arkansas (AR), California (CA), Hawaii (HI), Mississippi (MS), New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), North Carolina (NC), Rhode Island (RI), and West Virginia (WV).

 

The directories vary greatly in their coverage and content. Some are available in multiple formats; most, in one only. Out of 73 identified directories, 8 are PDF files, 19 are CD-ROMs, 29 are print compilations, and 17 are online databases.

 

This post covers the Mid-Atlantic States of Delaware (DE), Maryland (MD), New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), Pennsylvania (PA), and West Virginia (WV), plus Washington, DC. Later posts will cover other regions in the United States of America.

 

The Mid-Atlantic States:

DELAWARE

Directory of Grantmakers Funding Programs in Delaware. Wilmington, DE: Delaware Association of Nonprofit Agencies, 2006. This free PDF file is available online and profiles 93 independent, corporate, and community foundations making grants in Delaware. On its website, the publisher reports that it plans no updates; it directs researchers to the Foundation Center.

 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

Guide to Greater Washington DC Grantmakers on CD-ROM. Version 6.0. New York, NY: The Foundation Center, 2008. This CD-based directory profiles more than 3,400 foundations, corporate giving programs, and public charities giving in the Washington, D.C. area. Researchers should note that many of these funders make grants internationally rather than locally.

 

MARYLAND

Local Funders List. Baltimore, MD: Maryland State Department of Education, 2012. This free Word file, available online, provides extensive contact information for 75 corporations and foundations making grants in Maryland.

 

Maryland’s Leading 500 Foundations. 7th Ed. Frederick, MD: Jankowski Associates, Inc., 2012. This print directory profiles each of Maryland’s 500 largest foundations, and gives contact information for smaller foundations.

 

NEW JERSEY

New Jersey has no state directory of grant makers.

 

NEW YORK

New York has no state directory of grant makers.

 

PENNSYLVANIA

Directory of Pennsylvania Foundations. 7th Ed. Springfield, PA: Triadvocates Press, 2008. This PDF file, available online, profiles more than 1,600 foundations that make grants in Pennsylvania.

 

Pennsylvania Foundations Online. West Chester, PA: Pennsylvania Foundations Online, 2012. This subscription-based and searchable online database profiles more than 2,200 foundations that make grants in Pennsylvania.

 

WEST VIRGINIA

West Virginia has no state directory of grant makers.

Directories are great tools for finding new funding sources. Nonprofits and other grant seekers can find state and local foundation directories for 41 of the 50 states and for Washington, DC. As of late 2012, the nine states that do not have current or recent state-specific foundation directories are: Arkansas (AR), California (CA), Hawaii (HI), Mississippi (MS), New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), North Carolina (NC), Rhode Island (RI), and West Virginia (WV).

 

The directories vary greatly in their coverage and content. Some are available in multiple formats; most, in one only. Out of 73 identified directories, 8 are PDF files, 19 are CD-ROMs, 29 are print compilations, and 17 are online databases.

 

This post covers the Southeastern States of Alabama (AL), Arkansas (AR), Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN), and Virginia (VA). Later posts will cover other regions in the United States of America.

 

The Southeastern States:

ALABAMA

Guide to Alabama Grantmakers. Birmingham, AL: Alabama Giving, 2011. This CD-ROM directory for Alabama profiles more than 1,000 funders and describes more than 6,000 recent grants.

 

ARKANSAS

Arkansas has no state directory of grant makers.

 

FLORIDA

The Complete Guide to Florida Foundations. Miami, FL: Florida Funding Publications, 2013. This print directory profiles more than 5,000 corporations and foundations that make grants in Florida.

 

Profiles of South Florida Funders Online. Miami, FL: Donors Forum of South Florida, 2012. This subscription-based, online database profiles almost 200 foundations and corporations that either make grants in Palm Beach, Broward, Miami-Dade, or Monroe counties or are based in these counties.

 

GEORGIA

Guide to Georgia Grantmakers on CD-ROM. New York, NY: The Foundation Center, 2008. This CD-based directory profiles more than 2,300 foundations, corporate giving programs, and public charities giving in Georgia and describes nearly 20,000 grants made in Georgia.

 

LOUISIANA

The Louisiana Foundation DataBook and CD. 4th Ed. Portland, OR: C&D Publishing, 2012. This print and CD-based directory profiles more than 1,100 foundations in Louisiana, and provides detailed descriptions of the largest grant makers.

 

MISSISSIPPI

Mississippi has no state directory of grant makers.

 

NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina has no state directory of grant makers.

 

SOUTH CAROLINA

South Carolina Foundation Directory. Mullin, Dawn, ed. 9th Ed. Columbia, SC: South Carolina State Library, 2010. This free PDF file is available online; it profiles more than 160 foundations and public charities that make grants in South Carolina.

 

TENNESSEE

The Tennessee Foundation DataBook and CD. Portland, OR: C&D Publishing, 2011. This print directory lists 1,519 foundations either located in Tennessee or giving in Tennessee, and includes profiles of the largest foundations.

 

VIRGINIA

Directory of Virginia Foundations. Richmond, VA: The Grants Connection, 2012.  This subscription-based, online database profiles more than 1,000 private, corporate, and community foundations located in Virginia, as well as other foundations giving in Virginia.

 

Directories are great tools for finding new funding sources. Nonprofits and other grant seekers can find state and local foundation directories for 41 of the 50 states and for Washington, DC. As of late 2012, the nine states that do not have current or recent state-specific foundation directories are: Arkansas (AR), California (CA), Hawaii (HI), Mississippi (MS), New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), North Carolina (NC), Rhode Island (RI), and West Virginia (WV).

 

The directories vary greatly in their coverage and content. Some are available in multiple formats; most, in one only. Out of 73 identified directories, 8 are PDF files, 19 are CD-ROMs, 29 are print compilations, and 17 are online databases.

 

This post covers the Great Plains States of Iowa (IA), Kansas (KS), Minnesota (MN), Missouri (MO), Nebraska (NE), North Dakota (ND), Oklahoma (OK), South Dakota (SD), and Wisconsin (WI). Later posts will cover other regions in the United States of America.

 

The Great Plains States:

IOWA

The Iowa Foundation DataBook and CD. Portland, OR: C&D Publishing, 2010. This print and CD-based directory profiles more than 1,200 foundations in Iowa and provides in-depth descriptions of the largest grant makers.

 

KANSAS

The Kansas Foundation DataBook and CD. 1st Ed.Portland, OR: C&D Publishing, 2008.This print and CD-based directory profiles more than 500 foundations in Kansas and provides in-depth descriptions of the largest grant makers.

 

MINNESOTA

2013 Minnesota Grants Directory. St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Council of Nonprofits, 2012. This print directory profiles more than 100 community foundations, corporate giving programs, and private foundations giving in Minnesota.

 

Minnesota Grantmakers Online Deluxe. Minneapolis, MN: Regents of the University of Minnesota, 2011. This restricted-access online database profiles more than 1,300 foundations and corporations making grants in Minnesota.

 

MISSOURI

Directory of Missouri Grantmakers on CD-ROM. 7th Ed. New York, NY: The Foundation Center, 2007. This CD-based directory profiles more than 2,100 grant makers located in Missouri and nearly 450 other grant makers giving in Missouri.

 

NEBRASKA

Foundation Resource Directory: A Guide to Grants for Nebraska Children, Youth, Families, and Communities. Lincoln, NE: Nebraska Department of Economic Development, 2012. This free PDF file, available online, profiles more than 40 foundations and corporations either located in Nebraska or giving in Nebraska.

 

The Nebraska Foundation DataBook and CD. Portland, OR: C&D Publishing, 2012. This print and CD-based directory lists more than 930 foundations either located in Nebraska or giving in Nebraska, and includes profiles of the 230 largest foundations.

 

NORTH DAKOTA

North Dakota has no state directory of grant makers.

 

OKLAHOMA

The Oklahoma Foundation DataBook and CD. 4th Ed. Portland, OR: C&D Publishing, 2011. This print and CD-based directory lists more than 1,330 foundations either located in Oklahoma or giving in Oklahoma, and includes profiles of the 304 largest foundations.

 

SOUTH DAKOTA

South Dakota Grant Directory. Pierre, SD: South Dakota State Library, 2012. This online database profiles more than 400 foundations either located in South Dakota or giving in South Dakota.

 

WISCONSIN

Foundations in Wisconsin. 31st Ed. Milwaukee, WI: Marquette University Funding Information Center, 2012. This print and subscription-based online directory profiles more than 1,300 foundations in Wisconsin.

 

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