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This post updates data posted early in 2013. It discusses grant-writing consultants’ retainer fees. It is part of an ongoing series. Other updated posts will discuss hourly rates and flat rates (also called per-proposal rates or per-project rates), prospect research fees, proposal review fees, and other topics related to the compensation of grant writers and to consulting.

 

Consultant Retainer Fees:

Many grant-writing consultants are willing to work under a retainer agreement for a small subset of select clients. Retainers work well when there is a steady flow of work and when the client and the consultant have a long-term relationship.

 

The client and the consultant both benefit from the predictability of the retainer arrangement. A typical retainer commits both parties to a specified minimum number of hours of service per month and to a specified number of months the agreement is to be in effect. Often the minimum number of hours is 10 hours per month and the minimum number of months is either 3 or 6. Often the retainer is paid monthly.

 

Services agreed upon in the retainer will depend upon the specific contract. Among such services may be one or more of:

  • Providing advisory and consulting services
  • Participating in planning sessions with client staff
  • Making presentations to client staff
  • Doing grant prospect research
  • Providing grant opportunity alerts
  • Preparing a set number of letters of inquiry per month
  • Providing assistance in proposal development
  • Developing a set number of proposals per month

 

Sample Retainers:

As the table below indicates, a retainer fee may cost as little as $1,250 per month or as much as $7,500 per month. Calculated on a quarterly basis, these extremes equate to a fee range of $3,750 to $22,500; on a yearly basis, they equate to a fee range of $15,000 to $90,000.

 

Retainers Minimum Maximum
Consultant/Firm A $1,000/month $3,000/month
Consultant/Firm B $1,250/month $7,500/month
Consultant/Firm C $1,500/month $3,000/month
Consultant/Firm D $2,000/month $4,000/month
Consultant/Firm E $3,000/month $5,000/month
Consultant/Firm F $850/month Unstated
Consultant/Firm G $3,000/month Unstated
Consultant/Firm H $3,000/month Unstated
Consultant/Firm I $100/hour Unstated
Consultant/Firm J $150/hour Unstated

 

Finding funding sources is often one of the most time-consuming aspects of seeking competitively awarded grants. This post presents links to sources of Federal grants from selected Federal grant-making agencies and offices. Earlier posts each surveyed several agencies and offices. This final post will survey others.

 

Links were live at the time of research; if one proves inactive — and it does not automatically redirect users to a live link — simply reduce the link back to its domain name (e.g., usda.gov) and review that website for a new link.

 

Among the agencies and offices of the United States government that offer competitively awarded grants are:

 

Libraries and Museums:

Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS):

http://www.imls.gov/applicants/default.aspx

 

Public Service:

Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS):

http://www.americorps.gov/for_organizations/funding/nofa_detail.asp?tbl_nofa_id=83

 

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics:

National Science Foundation (NSF):

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/

    •    Crosscutting and NSF-Wide Funding Opportunities:

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_list.jsp?type=xcut

    •    Directorate for Biological Sciences (BIO):

http://www.nsf.gov/dir/index.jsp?org=bio

    •    Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE):

http://www.nsf.gov/dir/index.jsp?org=cise

    •    Directorate for Education and Human Resources (EHR):

http://www.nsf.gov/dir/index.jsp?org=ehr

    •    Directorate for Engineering (ENG):

http://www.nsf.gov/dir/index.jsp?org=eng

    •    Directorate for Geosciences (GEO):

http://www.nsf.gov/dir/index.jsp?org=geo

    •    Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences (MPS):

http://www.nsf.gov/dir/index.jsp?org=mps

    •    Directorate for Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences (SBE):

http://www.nsf.gov/dir/index.jsp?org=sbe

    •    Environmental Research and Education (ERE):

http://www.nsf.gov/dir/index.jsp?org=ERE

    •    Office of Cyber Infrastructure (OCI):

http://www.nsf.gov/dir/index.jsp?org=OCI

    •    Office of Integrative Activities (OIA):

http://www.nsf.gov/dir/index.jsp?org=oia

    •    Office of International Science and Engineering (OISE):

http://www.nsf.gov/div/index.jsp?div=OISE

    •    Office of Polar Programs (OPP):

http://www.nsf.gov/dir/index.jsp?org=opp

 

Social Security: 

Social Security Administration (SSA):

http://www.ssa.gov/oag/grants/ssagrant.htm

 

State:

US Department of State (State):

    •    Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA):

http://eca.state.gov/organizational-funding/open-grant-solicitations

    •   Bureau of Intelligence and Research (INR):

http://www.state.gov/s/inr/grants/index.htm

    •    Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs:

http://www.state.gov/e/oes/

 

Transportation:

US Department of Transportation (DOT:

    •    Research and Innovative Technology Administration (RITA):

http://www.rita.dot.gov/rdt/

    •    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSB):

http://www.nhtsa.gov/About+NHTSA/Programs+&+Grants

Finding funding sources is often one of the most time-consuming aspects of seeking competitively awarded grants. This post presents links to sources of Federal grants from selected Federal grant-making agencies and offices. Earlier posts each surveyed several agencies and offices. Later posts will survey others.

 

Links were live at the time of research; if one proves inactive — and it does not automatically redirect users to a live link — simply reduce the link back to its domain name (e.g., usda.gov) and review that website for a new link.

 

Among the agencies and offices of the United States government that offer competitively awarded grants include:

 

Homeland Security:

US Department of Homeland Security (DHS):

http://www.dhs.gov/how-do-i/find-and-apply-grants

 

Housing and Urban Development:

US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD):

http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/topics/grants

 

Interior:

US Department of the Interior (DOI):

http://www.doi.gov/businesses/working-with-interior.cfm

    •    United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS):

http://www.fws.gov/grants/

    •    United States Geological Survey (USGS):

http://www.usgs.gov/contracts/index.html

 

Justice:

US Department of Justice (DOJ):

    •    National Institute of Justice (NIJ):

http://www.nij.gov/funding/welcome.htm

    •   Office for Victims of Crime (OVC):

http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/ovc/grants/index.html

    •    Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP):

http://www.ojjdp.gov/funding/funding.html

 

Labor:

US Department of Labor (DOL):

http://www.dol.gov/dol/grants2.htm#.UKzTdHjFKQo

    •    Bureau of International Labor Affairs (ILAB):

http://www.dol.gov/ILAB/grants/#.UKzXjnjFKQo

    •   Employment and Training Administration (ETA):

http://www.doleta.gov/grants/

    •    Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA):

http://www.msha.gov/programs/epd4.htm

    •    Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA):

http://www.osha.gov/dte/sharwood/

    •    Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP):

http://www.dol.gov/odep/topics/grants.htm#.UKzYk3jFKQo

    •    Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration and Management (OASAM):

http://www.dol.gov/oasam/grants/prgms.htm#.UKzYG3jFKQo

    •    Veterans Employment and Training Service (VETS):

http://www.dol.gov/vets/grants/#.UKzXyHjFKQo

 

Finding funding sources is often one of the most time-consuming aspects of seeking competitively awarded grants. This post presents links to sources of Federal grants from selected Federal grant-making agencies and offices. An earlier post surveyed several of these agencies and offices. Later posts will survey others.

 

Links were live at the time of research; if one proves inactive — and it does not automatically redirect users to a live link — simply reduce the link back to its domain name (e.g., usda.gov) and review that website for a new link.

 

Among the agencies and offices of the United States government that offer competitively awarded grants are:

 

Education:

US Department of Education (USDE): 


http://www2.ed.gov/fund/grant/about/grantmaking/index.html

    •    Institute of Education Sciences (IES):

http://ies.ed.gov/funding/

    •    Office of Educational Technology (OET):

http://www.ed.gov/edblogs/technology/grants/

    •    Office of Elementary and Secondary Education (OESE):

http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/oese/programs.html

    •    Office of English Language Acquisition (OELA):

http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/oela/programs.html

    •    Office of Innovation and Improvement (OII):

http://www.ed.gov/oii-news/funding-opportunities

    •    Office of Postsecondary Education (OPE):

http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ope/programs.html

    •    Office of Vocational and Adult Education (OVAE):

http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ovae/programs.html

 

Energy:

US Department of Energy (DOE):

http://energy.gov/public-services/funding-opportunities

    •    Advanced Research Projects Agency- Energy (ARPA-E):

http://arpa-e.energy.gov/About/FAQs/FundingOpportunities.aspx

    •    Office of Science:

http://science.doe.gov/grants/index.asp

 

Environment:

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA):

http://www.epa.gov/epahome/grants.htm

    •    National Center for Environmental Research (NCER):

http://epa.gov/ncer/

 

Health and Human Services:

US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS):

http://dhhs.gov/asfr/ogapa/aboutog/grantsnet.html

    •    Administration for Children and Families (ACF):

http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/

    •    Administration on Aging (AA):

http://www.aoa.gov/AoARoot/Grants/index.aspx

    •    Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ):

http://www.ahrq.gov/fund/index.html

    •    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):

http://www.cdc.gov/od/pgo/funding/grants/grantmain.shtm

    •    Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS):

http://www.cms.gov/Research-Statistics-Data-and-Systems/Research/ResearchDemoGrantsOpt/index.html

    •    Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA):

http://www.hrsa.gov/grants/index.html

    •    National Institutes of Health (NIH):

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/oer.htm

    •    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA):

http://www.samhsa.gov/grants/

 

Finding funding sources is often one of the most time-consuming aspects of seeking competitively awarded grants. This post presents links to sources of Federal grants from selected grant-making Federal agencies and offices. Later posts will survey others.

 

Links were live at the time of research; if one proves inactive — and it does not automatically redirect users to a live link — simply reduce the link back to its domain name (e.g., usda.gov) and review that website for a new link.

 

Among the agencies and offices of the United States government that offer competitively awarded grants are:

 

Aeronautics and Space:

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA):

http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/solicitations.do?method=init&stack=push

Agriculture:

US Department of Agriculture (USDA):

http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/usda/usdahome?navid=GRANTS_LOANS

    •    United States Forest Service (USFS):

http://www.fs.fed.us/research/

    •    National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA):

http://www.nifa.usda.gov/fo/funding.cfm

Archives:

National Archives and Records Administration (NARA):

http://www.archives.gov/nhprc/announcement/

Arts and Humanities:

National Endowment for the Arts (NEA):

http://arts.endow.gov/grants/apply/index.html

National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH):

http://www.neh.gov/grants

Commerce:

US Department of Commerce (DOC):

http://www.commerce.gov/about-commerce/grants-contracting-trade-opportunities

    •    Economic Development Administration (EDA):

http://www.eda.gov/ffo.htm

    •    National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST):

http://www.nist.gov/director/ocfo/grants/grants.cfm

    •    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA):

http://www.ago.noaa.gov/index.html

    •    National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA):

http://www.ntia.doc.gov/category/grants

Defense:

US Department of Defense (DOD):

    •    Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR):

http://www.wpafb.af.mil/library/factsheets/factsheet.asp?id=8981

    •    Army Research Office (ARO)

http://www.arl.army.mil/www/default.cfm?page=506

    •    Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP):

http://cdmrp.army.mil/funding/default.shtml

    •    Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s (DARPA):

http://www.darpa.mil/Opportunities/Solicitations/DARPA_Solicitations.aspx

    •    Office of Naval Research (ONR):

http://www.onr.navy.mil/Contracts-Grants.aspx

    •    Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP):

http://www.serdp.org/Funding-Opportunities/SERDP-Solicitations

In grant seeking, the term ‘sustainability’ has several distinct meanings. One of its meanings raises questions about whether and to what degree an applicant is apt to continue to do what a requested grant will enable it to do after that initial grant ends.

 

Particularly when seeking large multiyear grants, school districts, like other applicants, must present cogent plans for future sustainability during the post-grant period. There are many ways they can address this issue in factual rather than conjectural terms. I offer seven possible ways here:

 

Organizational Precedents:

A proposal might describe a district’s past organizational commitments to arguably similar initiatives or projects. If a district has a 3-5 year (or longer) history of consistently investing in its technology infrastructure, or in its after school programs, or in its family/community engagement programs, there is a reasonable prospect — based on that recent track record — that such commitments (and funding trends) will continue after the completion of a new project to expand or intensify or perfect such efforts. I’d call this the Organizational Precedents strategy.

 

Plan Linkage:

A narrative might describe a district’s past and present organizational declarations of priorities, goals, and strategies— such as are often found in each school’s Site Improvement Plan as well as in a district’s Strategic Plan, Technology Plan, Professional Development Plan, and so on — and pull quotes judiciously from them. It can discuss how a proposed project is anchored in and advances such plans. If a new project advances an existing plan, already in place and adopted locally, its strategies are more likely to retain traction and elicit support after a new project — undertaken to serve as a catalyst for advancing such plans — comes to an end. I’d call this the Plan Linkage strategy.

 

Board Policy Directives:

A proposal might cite Board-adopted policies, goals, priorities, or similar imperatives or directives that relate to the new project and which that new project would either advance or serve to implement. If a proposed project has the local Board of Education behind it, its strategies (and their associated costs) are more likely to be sustained post-grant. I’d call this the Board Policy Directive strategy.

 

Leveraging Partnerships:

A narrative might describe a district’s pursuit and creation of partnerships with other (for-profit and non-profit) organizations whose organizational and/or financial resources might be brought to bear in sustaining the district’s project or initiative post-grant. A proposal might also describe local precedents for partnerships pooling their assets in pursuit of shared goals. If a project’s strategies reflect a broadly shared community vision they are more likely to persist post-grant. I’d call this the Leveraging Partnerships strategy.

 

Evaluation of Effectiveness:

A proposal might discuss how the findings of monitoring and evaluation will be used to identify effective project strategies and/or its key grant-funded positions or functions to be sustained by other means post-grant. Both monitoring and evaluation should be asking what works well and what does not, and it makes no sense for a district to continue what does not work well (or its associated costs) after a grant ends. I’d call this the Evaluation of Effectiveness strategy.

 

Seamless Funding:

An itemized budget and a budget justification narrative might demonstrate a district’s awareness of other (mandatory, formula-based) funding streams (e.g., NCLB Titles I, II, III, and VII and IDEA Part B, among many others) that may be brought to bear post-grant to sustain some of the project’s effective strategies and/or some of its key grant-funded positions or functions. Much of this funding is far less categorical, and far more flexible, than it once was, and it is thus expected to work in synergy with other funding sources, including discretionary grants. I’d call this the Seamless Funding strategy.

 

Expecting the Expected:

Finally, development office staff might remind administrators (whoever will listen) that if they do request funding for 50.0 FTE new grant-funded positions (as can happen in large urban comprehensive school reform projects), they need to realize that reviewers will expect its proposal to drop a few persuasive hints about how the district anticipates absorbing such significant costs post-grant. I’d call this the Expecting the Expected strategy.

 

There are other strategies. But perhaps these will provide a starting point.

This post is the last in a series. It covers locating requests for proposals (RFPs) for K-12 Education grants on state department of education (SDE) websites for all 50 states in the United States of America. Earlier posts have covered the SDEs for the individual states organized into seven regions: New England, Mid Atlantic, Southeast, Midwest, Great Plains, Northwest, and Southwest.

 

SDE websites varied greatly in how they handled information about grant opportunities and RFPs for K-12 Education. Some SDE websites proved to be much more accessible to the public, much more informative, and much easier to navigate than others.

 

Overview of Access to SDE RFPs:

In the table below is an overview of the results of exploring the 50 states’ websites in terms of: (1) consolidation of posting of RFPs; (2) access to active RFPs; (3) access to archived RFPs; (4) access to RFPs for 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21stCCLC) grants; and (5) access to RFPs for Mathematics and Science Partnerships (MSP) grants.

 

 

Consolidated RFP

Active RFP

Archived RFP

21stCCLC RFP

MSP RFP

 

Yes

Partial

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

New England

3

1

2

5

1

3

3

5

1

4

2

Mid Atlantic

4

0

2

5

1

2

4

6

0

3

3

Southeast

1

2

7

5

5

3

7

6

4

2

8

Midwest

1

1

3

4

1

3

2

5

0

4

1

Great Plains

1

0

8

7

2

4

5

6

3

5

4

Northwest

1

0

5

6

0

3

3

5

1

4

2

Southwest

3

3

2

6

2

2

6

5

3

4

4

TOTALS

14

7

29

38

12

20

30

38

12

26

24

 

Consolidated Education RFPs:

In the table, ‘Consolidated’ means that RFPs are located all in one place; it is easy to find both active and archived RFPs on one site; and the site is searchable in varied ways (e.g., by fund code, program name, date posted, date due, and grant type).

 

Results for SDE RFP access consolidation were that 14 (or 28%) were consolidated, 7 (or 14%) were partially consolidated, and 29 (or 58%) were not consolidated. The regions where searchers were most likely to find SDEs that consolidated access to RFPs were Mid Atlantic, New England, and Southwest.

 

Active Education RFPs:

In the table, ‘Active’ refers to grant competitions that were open for which an SDE was soliciting applications at the time of the search (or had done so very recently). If grant seekers could easily find and access active RFPs, they could respond to them more readily.

 

Results for exploring access to Active RFPs were that 38 (or 76%) of the SDE sites did post active (or recently closed) RFPs, and 12 of them (or 24%) did not. The regions where searchers were most likely to find SDEs that posted active RFPs were Northwest, New England, Mid Atlantic, and Midwest.

 

Archived Education RFPs:

In the table, ‘Archived’ refers to competitions that were closed, but for which past applications were available at the time of the search. Access to Archived RFPs could help potential applicants to plan for future ‘Active’ proposals.

 

Results for exploring access to Archived RFPs were that 20 (or 40%) of the SDE sites did post archived, and 30 (or 60%) did not. The regions where searchers were most likely to find SDEs that posted archived RFPs were Midwest, New England, and Northwest.

 

21stCCLC RFPs:

In the table, the term ‘21stCCLC RFP’ refers to the RFP for the state-administered, federal-origin educational grants program, 21st Century Community Leaning Centers (21stCCLC).

 

Results for exploring access to 21stCCLC RFPs were that 38 (or 76%) of the SDE sites did post RFPs for 21stCCLC, and 12 (or 24%) did not. The 21stCCLC RFP was used merely as a test for gauging the ease of locating RFPs on SDE websites. The regions where searchers were most likely to find SDEs that posted RFPs for 21stCCLC were Mid Atlantic, Midwest, New England, and Northwest.

 

MSP RFPs:

In the table, the term ‘MSP RFP’ refers to the RFP for the state-administered, federal-origin educational grants program, Mathematics and Science Partnerships (MSP).

 

Results for exploring access to MSP RFPs were that 26 (or 52%) of the SDE sites did post RFPs for MSP, and 24 (or 48%) did not. The ‘MSP RFP’ was used merely as a second test for gauging the ease of locating RFPs on SDE websites. The regions where searchers were most likely to find SDEs that posted RFPs for MSP were Midwest, New England, and Northwest.

 

Observations:

Among SDE sites that made it comparatively easier to find RFPs were California, Connecticut, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Texas, and Washington. By contrast, among SDE sites that made it comparatively harder to find RFPs were Alabama, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, and Utah. Finally, among SDEs that appeared to limit public access to RFPs were Montana and Pennsylvania.

 

State Department of Education (SDE) websites vary greatly in how they handle information about grant opportunities and requests for proposals (RFPs) for K-12 Education. Some SDE websites prove to be much more accessible to the public, much more informative, and much easier to navigate than others.

 

This post covers SDE websites for Arizona (AZ), California (CA), Colorado (CO), Hawaii (HI), Nevada (NV), New Mexico (NM), Texas (TX), and Utah (UT). Earlier posts have covered other regions in the United States of America. A final post will provide a synopsis of access to RFPs for K-12 Education in the 50 states.

 

State Education RFP Databases: Southwest

In this series, ‘Consolidated’ means that requests for proposals (RFPs) are located all in one place and are easy to find; ‘Active’ refers to competitions that are open for which applications are being solicited at present (or very recently); and ‘Archived’ refers to competitions that are closed, but for which past applications are available. Access to archived RFPs can help potential applicants to plan for future ‘Active’ proposals.

 

The term ‘21stCCLC RFP’ refers to the RFP for the state-administered, Federal educational grants program, 21st Century Community Leaning Centers (21stCCLC); the term ‘MSP RFP’ refers to the RFP for the state-administered, Federal educational grants program, Mathematics-Science Partnerships (MSP). The ‘21stCCLC RFP’ and the ‘MSP RFP’ are both used merely as tests for gauging the ease of locating RFPs on SDE websites.

 

State

Consolidated

Active RFPs

Archived RFPs

21stCCLC RFP

MSP RFP

Arizona

Partial

No

No

No

No

California

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Colorado

Partial

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Hawaii

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

Nevada

No

Yes

No

No

Yes

New Mexico

Partial

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Texas

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Utah

No

No

No

Yes

No

 

Arizona: 

The Arizona SDE has a partially consolidated site for state/federal RFPs. Its primary grants-related site has links to some RFPs. The SDE’s ‘Application Downloads’ site lists some active and inactive RFPs (called ‘applications’) from FY2013, but none for 21stCCLC or MSP. Its ‘All Programs’ index page lists three ‘grant/funding opportunities;’ none of them is 21stCCLC or MSP. Its ‘federal programs’ index entry lists both 21stCCLC and MSP. The SDE’s ’21st Century Learning Centers’ site does not present any active or archived RFPs. Its ‘Mathematics and Science Partnership Program’ site notes that ‘applications’ are not ‘currently available’ for MSP; it provides no links to archived RFPs. Arizona’s ‘on-line applications’ link does not list active RFPs and requires users to be pre-registered.

 

California:

The California SDE has a consolidated site for state/federal RFPs, which is searchable for ‘available funding’ by topic, funding type, fiscal year, and key words. Users can use the site’s user-configurable Search boxes and select a span from an earlier fiscal year to the present fiscal year to retrieve a full listing. They can also search funding more broadly by fiscal year, type, status, topic, keyword(s), or any combination.

 

Searchers can find an active FY2013 RFP for the 21stCCLC program by searching the SDE site’s A-Z Topic Index for ‘after school,’ and then clicking through several links. They can find an archived RFP for the MSP program by searching the SDE site’s A-Z Topic Index for ‘science’ (not ‘mathematics’ or ‘partnerships’) and clicking thru several links.

 

Colorado:

The Colorado SDE has a partially consolidated site for state/federal RFPs for ‘PreK-12 Education Grants’. It offers links to internal and external sources of grants and grant-related resources, including links that lead ultimately to RFPs. Its list of links to ‘competitive grants’ includes 21stCCLC, among other programs, but not MSP. A separate page for ‘Competitive Grants and Awards’ lists links to 21stCCLC and MSP as well as other federal programs. There are no links to archived RFPs. The SDE’s 21stCCLC program site includes a sidebar sub-link to ’21stCCLC grant competitions’ and an active FY2013 RFP. Its ‘Mathematics and Science Partnerships’ program site includes an active FY2013 RFP.

 

Hawaii:

The Hawaii SDE has a consolidated site for state/federal RFPs. It presents links to ‘Funding Opportunities’ as well as to an application portal, which requires users to be preregistered. On the ‘Funding Opportunities’ sidebar, a link leads to a vast list of public and private grant sources. No state opportunities appear in the search return when it is filtered as ‘State’. No archived or active RFPs for 21stCCLC or MSP appear when it is filtered as ‘Federal’.

 

Nevada:

The Nevada SDE has no consolidated site for state/federal RFPs. The SDE’s ‘Hot Topics’ site has a link to an active FY2013 MSP RFP. Using the site’s Search box, searches for ‘RFP’ and ‘grants’ turn up only the MSP RFP. The SDE’s ‘Programs’ link on its ‘Educators’ pull-down list includes links to 21stCCLC and other federal programs, but none to MSP, and no links to active or archived RFPs.

 

New Mexico:

The New Mexico SDE has a partially consolidated site for state/federal RFPs. It puts active RFPs, RFAs, and RFIs all in one place and includes a link to an active FY2013 RFP for 21stCCLC and an active FY2013 RFP for MSP. New Mexico’s SDE site has no searchable A-Z Index link and no Search box features. There is no separate collection of archived RFPs.

 

Texas:

The Texas SDE has a consolidated site for state/federal RFPs. It includes active and archived RFPs. Searchers can configure searches by application name, program/subject area, posting status, funding type, application type, school year, availability date, and due date. A search configured as ‘confirmed’ ‘federal’ ‘2013-2014’ ‘discretionary competitive’ generates an active RFP for 21stCCLC and other programs. Unfortunately, variously configured searches for an RFP for MSP turn up no results.

 

Utah:

The Utah SDE has no consolidated site for state/federal RFPs. Its website has no links for ‘grants’ or ‘applications’ or ‘RFPs,’ no links to archived RFPs, and no list of active RFPs. The SDE’s A-Z Index presents no links for ‘grants,’ ‘RFPs,’ ‘applications,’ or similar entries. Site users must search the Federal program links for an announcement of a grant opportunity; the term ‘announcement’ indicates notice of an RFP. There is no federal program link for MSP or for an active or archived RFP for MSP. An active FY2013 RFP for the 21stCCLC program is available.

 

Note:

The FY2013 Federal budget no longer funds grant competitions under Title II Part D (Enhancing Education Through Technology); thus, this program is absent from discussions in this series.

 

State Department of Education (SDE) websites vary greatly in how they handle information about grant opportunities and requests for proposals (RFPs) for K-12 Education. Some SDE websites prove to be much more accessible to the public, much more informative, and much easier to navigate than others.

 

This post covers websites for Alaska (AK), Idaho (ID), Montana (MT), Oregon (OR), Washington (WA), and Wyoming (WY). Later posts will cover other regions in the United States of America. A final post will provide a synopsis of access to RFPs for K-12 Education in the 50 states.

 

State Education RFP Database: Northwest

In this series, ‘Consolidated’ means that requests for proposals (RFPs) are located all in one place and are easy to find; ‘Active’ refers to competitions that are open for which applications are being solicited at present (or very recently); and ‘Archived’ refers to competitions that are closed, but for which past applications are available. Access to archived RFPs can help potential applicants to plan for future ‘Active’ proposals.

 

The term ‘21stCCLC RFP’ refers to the RFP for the state-administered, Federal educational grants program, 21st Century Community Leaning Centers (21stCCLC); the term ‘MSP RFP’ refers to the RFP for the state-administered, Federal educational grants program, Mathematics-Science Partnerships (MSP). The ‘21stCCLC RFP’ and the ‘MSP RFP’ are both used merely as tests for gauging the ease of locating RFPs on SDE websites.

 

State

Consolidated

Active RFPs

Archived RFPs

21stCCLC RFP

MSP RFP

Alaska

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Idaho

No

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Montana

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Oregon

No

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Washington

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Wyoming

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

Alaska:

The Alaska SDE has no consolidated site for state/federal RFPs. The SDE’s ‘Forms and Grants’ site includes a sub-heading for ‘competitive grants’ but lists only one RFP under it. Other RFPs (called ‘requests for application’ or RFAs, also called simply ‘applications’) are available under other sub-headings. Searchers must scroll down for sub-headings for specific titles and programs. The site includes no archived RFPs and no sub-headings for Title II B (MSP) or Title IV B (21stCCLC) and thus no links to RFPs for either program. The SDE’s ’21st Century Alaska Community Learning Center’ program site includes a recently closed FY2013 RFP. The list of ‘programs’ on the SDE’s ‘Educators and Administrators’ page omits ‘mathematics,’ ‘science,’ or ‘MSP’. User searches on the SDE’s Search box turn up no links to ‘Mathematics and Science Partnerships’ or ‘MSP’.

 

Idaho:

The Idaho SDE has no consolidated site for state/federal RFPs. Searchers must sift through the list of links on the ‘Programs’ site for RFPs for specific programs of interest. The SDE’s 21stCCLC ‘programs’ page includes a sidebar link to the ‘Competitive Grant Process’ and a recently closed FY2013 RFP (called here an ‘application’) for 21stCCLC. The SDE’s Mathematics ‘programs’ page has a sidebar link to ‘Math-Science Partnership Grants’, which presents a recently closed FY2013 RFP (called here a ‘Request for Proposals’) for MSP. There is no SDE archive of RFPs.

 

Montana:

The Montana SDE has no consolidated site for state/federal RFPs. The SDE has a log-on portal for applicants. It lists ‘grants currently available through e-Grants.’ 21stCCLC is listed, but not as a link. For the uninitiated, the SDE’s RFPs at first appear accessible by using the ‘Public Access’ log-on where a list of links appears. Listed RFPs are sorted as ‘competitive grant’, ‘discretionary grant’, or ‘formula grant’. The 21stCCLC program appears as a ‘competitive grant’ while the MSP program does not. However, the RFPs are inaccessible to the general public without users having been pre-designated as an authorized representative (AR) of a local educational agency (LEA).

 

Oregon:

The Oregon SDE has no consolidated site for state/federal RFPs. Users must search the ‘E-Grant Management System’ for specific program RFPs. The SDE presents an active RFP for MSP under the heading of ‘Elementary & Secondary Ed Act (ESEA)-Grant/Program Info’ (sic). An archived FY2012 MSP RFP is at the ‘Oregon Mathematics and Science Partnership’ program site, and an archived FY2012 RFP is at the 21stCCLC program site.

 

Washington:

The Washington SDE has a consolidated site for state/federal RFPs as well as an application portal for LEAs and others. RFPs are in fact accessible without a special login. Users must follow the SDE site’s ‘Form Package Inventory’ link. This latter site explains that ‘form package’ means ‘all components of an online grant application or report’ of such types as: ‘federal/state formula grants, federal/state competitive grants (RFPs), federal/state consortium grants, agreements, waivers, foundation grants, and end-of-year reports.’ Searchers may select the ‘form package type’ of interest and scan its contents for a program of interest. An archived 21stCCLC RFP and an archived MSP RFP are found under the ‘federal competitive grants’ form package type. Hit the program’s link and a detailed ‘Profile’ page pops up.

 

Wyoming:

The Wyoming SDE has no consolidated site for state/federal RFPs. Its ‘All Programs’ site lists state/federal programs, which may or may not have active or archived RFPs. The SDE’s ‘Grants’ site leads to both active and archived ‘RFPs’ and ‘applications’ for MSP, GEAR UP, and other state/federal programs, but not any to 21stCCLC. Its 21stCCLC program site leads to program-specific information and includes links to active and archived RFPs.

 

Note:

The FY2013 Federal budget no longer funds grant competitions under Title II Part D (Enhancing Education Through Technology); thus, this program is absent from discussions in this series.

 

State Department of Education (SDE) websites vary greatly in how they handle information about grant opportunities and requests for proposals (RFPs) for K-12 Education. Some SDE websites prove to be much more accessible to the public, much more informative, and much easier to navigate than others.

 

This post covers websites for Iowa (IA), Kansas (KS), Minnesota (MN), Missouri (MO), Nebraska (NE), North Dakota (ND), Oklahoma (OK), South Dakota (SD), and Wisconsin (WI). Later posts will cover other regions in the United States of America. A final post will provide a synopsis of access to RFPs for K-12 Education in the 50 states.

 

State Education RFP Databases: Great Plains

In this series, ‘Consolidated’ means that requests for proposals (RFPs) are located all in one place and are easy to find; ‘Active’ refers to competitions that are open for which applications are being solicited at present (or very recently); and ‘Archived’ refers to competitions that are closed, but for which past applications are available. Access to archived RFPs can help potential applicants to plan for future ‘Active’ proposals.

 

The term ‘21stCCLC RFP’ refers to the RFP for the state-administered, Federal educational grants program, 21st Century Community Leaning Centers (21stCCLC); the term ‘MSP RFP’ refers to the RFP for the state-administered, Federal educational grants program, Mathematics-Science Partnerships (MSP). The ‘21stCCLC RFP’ and the ‘MSP RFP’ are both used merely as tests for gauging the ease of locating RFPs on SDE websites.

 

State

Consolidated

Active RFPs

Archived RFPs

21stCCLC RFP

MSP RFP

Iowa

No

No

Yes

No

No

Kansas

No

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Minnesota

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Missouri

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Nebraska

No

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

North Dakota

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Oklahoma

No

Yes

No

No

Yes

South Dakota

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Wisconsin

No

No

No

No

No

 

Iowa:

The Iowa SDE has no consolidated site for state/federal RFPs. A link to ‘Requests for Proposals (RFPs)’ on the SDE site’s A-Z Index takes users off-site to a list of links for multiple state agencies. This latter site’s ‘Grant Opportunities Offered by State Agencies’ link leads to an archive of RFPs, including an FY2011 RFP for 21stCCLC, but no archived RFPs for MSP. Neither the SDE’s 21stCCLC program site nor its MSP program site posts any active or archived RFPs.

 

Kansas:

The Kansas SDE has no consolidated site for state/federal RFPs. The SDE website has a scrollable ‘Topics’ list with links to ‘Grants’ and this page leads in turn to ‘federal programs’ and to ‘state programs.’ Some links on these two sites in turn present further links to specific program RFPs. There is no RFP archive. The SDE’s MSP program site includes a link to a closed FY2013 RFP. Its 21stCCLC program site includes a link to an active FY2013 RFP.

 

Minnesota:

The Minnesota SDE has a consolidated site for RFPs. The SDE requires potential applicants to preregister in order to apply, but users can access active and archived RFPs without registering. The SDE site includes a searchable database of active RFPs; it lists only formula grants. It also includes an extensive archive of past state/federal formula and competitive ‘grant applications’ (which are in fact RFPs) going back several years. Among these are closed FY2012 RFPs for both the MSP program and the 21stCCLC program.

 

Missouri:

The Missouri SDE has no consolidated site for state/federal RFPs. Users must search for ‘grants’ using the site’s Search box. The SDE’s ‘Discretionary Grants’ site posts no RFPs. Its ‘Math/Grants’ site posts two links to external grant opportunities, but no links to MSP. The SDE’s ‘Afterschool Grants’ site has links to RFPs for three programs, including an archived 21stCCLC RFP. Its ‘Career Education’ site also posts links to RFPs (called ‘grant applications’).

 

Nebraska:

The Nebraska SDE has no consolidated site for state/federal RFPs and no archive of RFPs. Users must use the SDE website’s ‘Departments and Programs’ Search feature and search for ‘rfp.’ The SDE’s ‘Federal Programs’ site’s link to the 21stCCLC program leads to a recently closed FY2013 RFP. Its ‘Mathematics and Science Partnerships’ program site leads to an active FY2013 RFP.

 

North Dakota:

The North Dakota SDE has no consolidated site for state/federal RFPs. Its ‘NCLB’ site does not consolidate RFPs. The NCLB site’s link to Title IIB in turn leads to a link for an archived FY2010 RFP for MSP. The same site’s link to Title IVB (21stCCLC) leads in turn to an active FY2013 RFP for 21stCCLC.

 

Oklahoma:

The Oklahoma SDE has no consolidated site for state/federal RFPs. Searchers must use the website’s Search box and search the Site Map/Index page for specific grant programs and for ‘grants,’ ‘RFP,’ ‘application,’ and similar terms. The SDE’s ‘Federal Programs’ page has a further link to Title IIB, which includes a link to the MSP RFP. The same site has no link for Title IVB (21stCCLC) and thus no links to any RFPs. There is no SDE archive of RFPs.

 

South Dakota:

The South Dakota SDE has no consolidated site for state/federal RFPs. Searchers must use the SDE website’s Search box and search the site for ‘grants’ and ‘application’ and similar terms. The SDE site’s ‘A-Z Index’ list of links and its ‘Finance, Grants, and Data Management’ pull-down links have no links for ‘grants,’ ‘RFPs,’  ‘applications,’ or similar terms. The A-Z Index has no link for ‘mathematics’ or ‘NCLB Title II B,’ and none for the MSP program. The SDE’s 21stCCLC program site has a link to a recently closed FY2013 RFP. There is no SDE archive of RFPs.

 

Wisconsin:

The Wisconsin SDE has no consolidated site for state/federal RFPs. Its ‘Grants’ site has a link to 21stCCLC program application guidance but not to an active or archived RFP. Other programs, such as Title II B (MSP), are not listed in SDE ‘Grants’ site’s index. The SDE lists multiple grants related to school nutrition separately. There is no SDE archive of RFPs.

 

Note:

The FY2013 Federal budget no longer funds grant competitions under Title II Part D (Enhancing Education Through Technology); thus, this program is absent from discussions in this series.

 

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