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Monthly Archives: July 2016

Directories are great tools for finding new funding sources. As of mid-2016, nonprofits, school districts, and other grant seekers can find state and local foundation directories for 38 of the 50 states. The states that do not have current or recently published state-specific directories of grant makers are: California (CA), Connecticut (CT), Delaware (DE), Georgia (GA), Hawaii (HI), Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), North Carolina (NC), North Dakota (ND), Rhode Island (RI), South Dakota (SD), and West Virginia (WV). Washington, DC (DC) also has none.

 

Available directories vary greatly in their quality, coverage, and content. Some are available in multiple formats; most, in one only. Since 2012, the number of state-specific directories has fallen by about 35%. In mid-2016, out of 47 identified directories, five are PDF files, 11 are compact disks (CDs), 22 are print compilations, and 20 are online databases.

 

This post covers the Southwestern states of Arizona (AZ), California (CA), Colorado (CO), Hawaii (HI), Nevada (NV), New Mexico (NM), Oklahoma (OK), Texas (TX), and Utah (UT). Later posts will cover other regions in the United States of America.

 

Southwest

 

The Southwestern States:

ARIZONA

Arizona Guide to Grants Online. Phoenix, AZ: Arizona Alliance of Nonprofits, 2016. This subscription-based, online, searchable database profiles more than 2,300 corporations and foundations making grants in Arizona.

 

Guide to Arizona Grantmakers. Phoenix, AZ: Arizona Alliance of Nonprofits, 2013. This print directory profiles almost 800 corporations and foundations either located in Arizona or giving in Arizona.

 

CALIFORNIA

California has no current or recently published state directory of grant makers. Northern California Grantmakers has ceased publication of its Guide to California Foundations; it refers researchers to the Foundation Center.

 

COLORADO

Colorado Grants Guide. Denver, CO: Community Resource Center, 2016. This subscription-based, online database profiles more than 750 local foundations, corporations, government agencies, and other entities that make grants to nonprofit organizations in Colorado.

 

HAWAII

Hawaii has no state directory of grant makers.

 

NEVADA

The Nevada Foundation Databook and CD. 1st Ed. Portland, OR: C&D Publishing, 2006. This print and CD-based directory lists 695 foundations either located in Nevada or giving in Nevada, and includes profiles of the largest foundations.

 

NEW MEXICO

New Mexico Grantmakers Directory. Albuquerque, NM: Center for Nonprofit Excellence, 2016.  This free and searchable database, which is available online, profiles 418 foundations and corporations that are either located in New Mexico or giving in New Mexico.

 

OKLAHOMA

The Oklahoma Foundation Databook and CD. 5th Ed. Portland, OR: C&D Publishing, 2013. This print and CD-based directory lists more than 1,125 foundations either located in Oklahoma or giving in Oklahoma, and includes profiles of the 300 largest foundations.

 

TEXAS

Texas has no state directory of grant makers. The Nonprofit Resource Center of Texas no longer publishes its Directory of Texas Foundations.

 

Texas Directory of Grantmakers Online. Fort Worth, TX: Funding Information Center, 2016.  This subscription-based, online directory profiles the philanthropic activity of more than 230 grant makers in Collin, Dallas, Denton, Hood, Johnson, Parker, Tarrant, and Wise counties in Texas.

 

UTAH

Philanthropic Foundations of Utah Directory 2012. American Fork, UT: Henry Dean Publishing, 2012. This print and CD-based directory profiles more than 500 foundations located in Utah and making grants in Utah.

 

The next post in this series will cover US Territories and Possessions.

 

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Directories are great tools for finding new funding sources. As of mid-2016, nonprofits, school districts, and other grant seekers can find state and local foundation directories for 38 of the 50 states. The states that do not have current or recently published state-specific directories of grant makers are: California (CA), Connecticut (CT), Delaware (DE), Georgia (GA), Hawaii (HI), Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), North Carolina (NC), North Dakota (ND), Rhode Island (RI), South Dakota (SD), and West Virginia (WV). Washington, DC (DC) also has none.

 

Available directories vary greatly in their quality, coverage, and content. Some are available in multiple formats; most, in one only. Since 2012, the number of state-specific directories has fallen by about 35%. In mid-2016, out of 47 identified directories, five are PDF files, 11 are compact disks (CDs), 22 are print compilations, and 20 are online databases.

 

This post covers the Midwestern States of Illinois (IL), Indiana (IN), Kentucky (KY), Michigan (MI), and Ohio (OH). Later posts will cover other regions in the United States of America.

 

Midwest

 

The Midwestern States:

ILLINOIS

Directory of Funding in Illinois. 11th Ed. Chicago, IL: Donors Forum of Chicago, 2012. This print directory profiles more than 5,500 foundations and corporations giving in Illinois.

 

Member Directory. Chicago, IL: Forefront, 2016. This searchable online directory profiles more than 175 foundations, corporations, and other funders that make grants in Illinois.

 

INDIANA

Directory of Indiana Grantmakers. Indianapolis, IN: Indiana Philanthropy Alliance, 2016. This subscription-based, online directory, which is also available in print format, profiles more than 1,000 foundations, trusts, and scholarship programs that make grants in Indiana.

 

KENTUCKY

The Kentucky Foundation DataBook and CD. 5th Ed. Portland, OR: C&D Publishing, 2013. This print and CD-based directory profiles more than 400 foundations in Kentucky and provides in-depth descriptions of the largest grant makers.

 

MIGHIGAN

Michigan Foundation Directory. 18th Ed. Grand Haven, MI: Council of Michigan Foundations, 2016. This print directory profiles more than 1,500 foundations that make grants in Michigan.

 

OHIO

2014-2015 Cincinnati Area Foundation Directory. 12th ed. Cincinnati, OH: MR & Company, 2014. This print directory profiles more than 115 foundations and charitable trusts located in the four Ohio counties and three Kentucky counties that comprise the Metropolitan Cincinnati area.

 

The next post in this series will cover the Great Plains.

 

 

Directories are great tools for finding new funding sources. As of mid-2016, nonprofits, school districts, and other grant seekers can find state and local foundation directories for 38 of the 50 states. The states that do not have current or recently published state-specific directories of grant makers are: California (CA), Connecticut (CT), Delaware (DE), Georgia (GA), Hawaii (HI), Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), North Carolina (NC), North Dakota (ND), Rhode Island (RI), South Dakota (SD), and West Virginia (WV). Washington, DC (DC) also has none.

 

Available directories vary greatly in their quality, coverage, and content. Some are available in multiple formats; most, in one only. Since 2012, the number of state-specific directories has fallen by about 35%. In mid-2016, out of 47 identified directories, five are PDF files, 11 are compact disks (CDs), 22 are print compilations, and 20 are online databases.

 

This post covers the Southeastern States of Alabama (AL), Arkansas (AR), Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN), and Virginia (VA). Later posts will cover other regions in the United States of America.

 

Southeast

 

The Southeastern States:

ALABAMA

Guide to Alabama Grantmakers. Birmingham, AL: Alabama Giving, 2016. This CD directory for Alabama profiles more than 1,000 funders and describes more than 6,000 recent grants.

 

ARKANSAS

Funding Sources. Fayetteville, AR: University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension, 2016. This free PDF file is available online; it lists more than 160 foundations and public charities that make grants in Arkansas.

 

FLORIDA

The Complete Guide to Florida Foundations. 21st Ed. Miami, FL: Florida Funding Publications, 2012. This print directory profiles more than 5,000 corporations and foundations that make grants in Florida.

 

GEORGIA

Georgia has no state directory of grant makers.

 

LOUISIANA

The Louisiana Foundation Databook and CD. 4th Ed. Portland, OR: C&D Publishing, 2012. This print and CD-based directory profiles more than 1,100 foundations in Louisiana, and provides detailed descriptions of the largest grant makers.

 

MISSISSIPPI

Mississippi has no state directory of grant makers.

 

NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina has no state directory of grant makers.

 

SOUTH CAROLINA

South Carolina Foundation Directory. Mullin, Dawn, ed. 9th Ed. Columbia, SC: South Carolina State Library, 2010. This free PDF file is available online; it profiles more than 160 foundations and public charities that make grants in South Carolina.

 

TENNESSEE

The Tennessee Foundation Databook and CD. 4th Ed. Portland, OR: C&D Publishing, 2013. This print directory lists 1,191 foundations located in Tennessee or giving in Tennessee, and includes profiles of the largest foundations.

 

VIRGINIA

Directory of Virginia Foundations. Richmond, VA: The Grants Connection, 2016.  This subscription-based, online database profiles more than 1,000 private, corporate, and community foundations located in Virginia, as well as other foundations giving in Virginia.

 

The next post in this series will cover the Midwest.

 

Directories are great tools for finding new funding sources. As of mid-2016, nonprofits, school districts, and other grant seekers can find state and local foundation directories for 38 of the 50 states. The states that do not have current or recently published state-specific directories of grant makers are: California (CA), Connecticut (CT), Delaware (DE), Georgia (GA), Hawaii (HI), Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), North Carolina (NC), North Dakota (ND), Rhode Island (RI), South Dakota (SD), and West Virginia (WV). Washington, DC (DC) also has none.

 

Available directories vary greatly in their quality, coverage, and content. Some are available in multiple formats; most, in one only. Since 2012, the number of state-specific directories has fallen by about 35%. In mid-2016, out of 47 identified directories, five are PDF files, 11 are compact disks (CDs), 22 are print compilations, and 20 are online databases.

 

This post covers the Great Plains States of Iowa (IA), Kansas (KS), Minnesota (MN), Missouri (MO), Nebraska (NE), North Dakota (ND), South Dakota (SD), and Wisconsin (WI). Later posts will cover other regions in the United States of America.

 

Great Plains

 

The Great Plains States:

IOWA

The Iowa Foundation DataBook and CD. http://foundationdatabook.com/iowa-foundations Portland, OR: C&D Publishing, 2010. This print and CD-based directory profiles more than 1,270 foundations in Iowa and provides in-depth descriptions of the largest grant makers.

 

KANSAS

The Kansas Foundation Databook and CD. 1st Ed. Portland, OR: C&D Publishing, 2008. This print and CD-based directory profiles more than 500 foundations in Kansas and provides in-depth descriptions of the largest grant makers.

 

MINNESOTA

2016 Minnesota Grants Directory. St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Council of Nonprofits, 2015. This print directory profiles more than 100 community foundations, corporate giving programs, and private foundations giving in Minnesota.

 

Minnesota Grantmakers Online Deluxe. Minneapolis, MN: Regents of the University of Minnesota, 2016. This restricted-access online database profiles more than 1,400 foundations and corporations making grants in Minnesota.

 

MISSOURI

Directory of Missouri Grantmakers on CD-ROM. 7th Ed. New York, NY: The Foundation Center, 2007. This CD-based directory profiles more than 2,100 grant makers located in Missouri and nearly 450 other grant makers giving in Missouri.

 

NEBRASKA

Foundation Resource Directory: A Guide to Grants for Nebraska Children, Youth, Families, and Communities. Lincoln, NE: Nebraska Department of Economic Development, 2014. This free PDF file, which is available online, profiles more than 140 foundations and corporations either located in Nebraska or giving in Nebraska.

 

The Nebraska Foundation Databook and CD. Portland, OR: C&D Publishing, 2012. This print and CD-based directory lists more than 930 foundations either located in Nebraska or giving in Nebraska, and includes profiles of the 230 largest foundations.

 

NORTH DAKOTA

North Dakota has no state directory of grant makers.

 

SOUTH DAKOTA

South Dakota has no state directory of grant makers.

 

WISCONSIN

Foundations in Wisconsin. 34th Ed. Milwaukee, WI: Marquette University Funding Information Center, 2015. This print and subscription-based, online directory profiles more than 1,275 foundations in Wisconsin.

 

The next post in this series will cover the Northwest.

 

Directories are great tools for finding new funding sources. As of mid-2016, nonprofits, school districts, and other grant seekers can find state and local foundation directories for 38 of the 50 states. The states that do not have current or recently published state-specific directories of grant makers are: California (CA), Connecticut (CT), Delaware (DE), Georgia (GA), Hawaii (HI), Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), North Carolina (NC), North Dakota (ND), Rhode Island (RI), South Dakota (SD), and West Virginia (WV). Washington, DC (DC) also has none.

 

Available directories vary greatly in their quality, coverage, and content. Some are available in multiple formats; most, in one only. Since 2012, the number of state-specific directories has fallen by about 35%. In mid-2016, out of 47 identified directories, five are PDF files, 11 are compact disks (CDs), 22 are print compilations, and 20 are online databases.

 

This post covers the Mid-Atlantic States of Delaware (DE), Maryland (MD), New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), Pennsylvania (PA), and West Virginia (WV), plus Washington, DC. Later posts will cover other regions in the United States of America.

 

Mid Atlantic

 

The Mid-Atlantic States:

DELAWARE

Delaware has no state directory of grant makers. The Delaware Association of Nonprofit Agencies no longer publishes the Directory of Grantmakers Funding Programs in Delaware as a free PDF file, available online. On its website, it reports that it plans no updates and directs researchers to the Foundation Center.

 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

Washington, D.C. has no directory of grant makers. The Foundation Center no longer publishes the Guide to Greater Washington DC Grantmakers on CD-ROM, a CD-based directory of profiles of foundations, corporate giving programs, and public charities giving in the Washington, D.C. area.

 

Washington Region’s Leading 500 Foundations. 4th Ed. Frederick, MD: Jankowski Associates, Inc., 2012. This print directory profiles each of the Washington DC region’s 500 largest foundations, and gives contact information for 500 smaller foundations.

 

MARYLAND

Local Funders List. Baltimore, MD: Maryland State Department of Education, 2016. This free list, available online, provides extensive contact information for 75 corporations and foundations making grants in Maryland.

 

Maryland’s Leading 500 Foundations. 8th Ed. Frederick, MD: Jankowski Associates, Inc., 2012. This print directory profiles each of Maryland’s 500 largest foundations, and gives contact information for 500 smaller foundations.

 

NEW JERSEY

New Jersey Grantmakers. Trenton, NJ: Council of New Jersey Grantmakers, 2016. This free and searchable online database profiles more than 5,500 foundations that make grants in New Jersey.

 

NEW YORK

New York has no state directory of grant makers.

 

PENNSYLVANIA

 

Pennsylvania Foundations Online. West Chester, PA: Pennsylvania Foundations Online, 2013. This subscription-based and searchable online database profiles more than 2,200 foundations that make grants in Pennsylvania. It has replaced the Directory of Pennsylvania Foundations after its 7th edition as a PDF file available online.

 

The 2014-2015 Pennsylvania Grant and Resource Directory. Harrisburg, PA: Pennsylvania House of Representatives, 2014. This PDF file, available online, profiles state and federal agencies and programs that make grants in Pennsylvania.

 

WEST VIRGINIA

West Virginia has no state directory of grant makers.

 

The next post in this series will cover the Southeast.

Directories are great tools for finding new funding sources. As of mid-2016, nonprofits, school districts, and other grant seekers can find state and local foundation directories for 38 of the 50 states. The states that do not have current or recently published state-specific directories of grant makers are: California (CA), Connecticut (CT), Delaware (DE), Georgia (GA), Hawaii (HI), Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), North Carolina (NC), North Dakota (ND), Rhode Island (RI), South Dakota (SD), and West Virginia (WV). Washington, DC (DC) also has none.

 

Available directories vary greatly in their quality, coverage, and content. Some are available in multiple formats; most, in one only. Since 2012, the number of state-specific directories has fallen by about 35%. In mid-2016, out of 47 identified directories, five are PDF files, 11 are compact disks (CDs), 22 are print compilations, and 20 are online databases.

 

This post covers the New England States of Connecticut (CT), Maine (ME), Massachusetts (MA), New Hampshire (NH), Rhode Island (RI,) and Vermont (VT). It is the first post in the series. Later posts will cover other regions in the United States of America.

 

New England

 

The New England States:

CONNECTICUT

Directory of Community Foundations Serving Connecticut. Hartford, CT: Connecticut Council for Philanthropy, 2016. This free online directory provides extensive contact information for 21 community foundations giving in Connecticut.

 

The Connecticut Council for Philanthropy no longer publishes a subscription-based, online database, which had been called Connecticut Grantmakers Online.

 

MAINE

Directory of Maine Grantmakers. 10th Ed. Portland, ME: Maine Philanthropy Center, 2015. This print and subscription-based online directory profiles more than 400 foundations and corporations either located in Maine or giving in Maine

 

MASSACHUSETTS

Grant Makers Directory. Boston, MA: Associated Grant Makers, 2016. This online database describes more than 1,900 grant makers in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and New Hampshire.

 

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Directory of Charitable Funds in New Hampshire. Concord, NH: New Hampshire Department of Justice, Office of the Attorney General, 2016. This free PDF file, available online, lists more than 400 grant-making organizations registered with the New Hampshire Office of the Attorney General and having assets of more than $25,000. A notice at CPG Fundraising indicates that it no longer publishes The Directory of New Hampshire Foundations.

 

RHODE ISLAND

Rhode Island has no state directory of grant makers.

 

VERMONT

Vermont Directory of Foundations Online. Middlebury VT and New York, NY: The Vermont Community Foundation and the Foundation Center, 2016.  This free print and online directory profiles 334 grant-making foundations located in Vermont and 287 other foundations located elsewhere but giving in Vermont.

 

The next post in this series will cover the Mid-Atlantic.

 

Myth: A grant can solve any problem.

Reality: Grants are not panaceas.

 

Myth of Singularity

 

Some organizations pursue grants on the premise that if they only had more funding then all of their problems would be solved. When they chase grants without first closely examining their needs and building a plan to resolve them, they are adhering to the Myth of Singularity. One variant of this myth turns up as: ‘We have money problems so we need a grant.’  A second variant surfaces as: ‘If we only had a grant, it would solve all of our money problems.’

 

In reality, a lack of funding may signal other needs, such as a need to diversify funding sources or a need to intensify efforts to obtain them. The same lack of funding may signal a need to organize the applicant on a more formal basis, a need for a strategic plan, a need for improved governance or leadership, a need for more extensive public engagement, or a need for better financial management. All of these needs, in turn, may indicate a more general lack of grant readiness.

 

Singularity Myth Graphic

 

Adherence to the Myth of Singularity imperils an applicant’s long-term viability. Applicants that rely heavily or exclusively on grants for funding may implode or fail entirely when grant funding periods end or when funders change priorities or cease to award grants.

 

Grants serve applicants better if they form only one part of a blend of several funding types and are not the sole type of support. Other types of support may include fees for service, gifts, endowments, investments, and volunteer support, among many others. Grants are more apt to help in solving an organization’s problems if they advance its vision and strategic plan than if they are sought reactively in panic over a looming crisis in finances.

 

The next post in this series on Myths in Grant Seeking will address the Myth of Relationships.

Myth: Grant writers should create proposals for free.

Reality: If it’s worth having, it’s worth paying for it.

 

Myth of Deferability

 

The Myth of Deferability reflects durable misapprehensions among grant seekers about what are acceptable arrangements for compensating individuals or firms that develop competitive grant proposals. Among its most persistent variants are: ‘Paying a grant writer on a commission basis is good practice’ and ‘Applicants can pay grant writers on a contingency basis.’

 

Deferability Myth Graphic

 

The reality is that the codes of ethics of several professional associations consistently prohibit grant writers and other members from contracting to be paid based either on a fraction of the amount of a grant award (commission) or on a positive funding outcome (contingency). Among such codes of ethics are those of the Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP), the American Grant Writer’s Association (AGWA), and the Grant Professionals Association (GPA).

 

There are many compelling reasons for such prohibitions. One reason is that the final proposal, as a work product delivered to the applicant, has value for the applicant’s future funding pursuits. The work product retains such value regardless of its immediate funding outcome.

 

A third variant of the Myth of Deferability occurs as: ‘Applicants can pay grant writers out of their grant awards.’  This variant holds a grain of truth. Federal regulations permit pre-award cost recovery for proposal development if a specific agency indicates it will do so in a specific proposal solicitation. The rules for the same kind of cost recovery for nonprofits differ — in significant ways — from those for units of state and local government. In the private sector, most foundations in fact prohibit post-award recovery of an applicant’s pre-award costs for proposal development, thus giving wings to the Myth of Deferability as a myth.

 

The next post in this series on Myths in Grant Seeking will address the Myth of Scarcity.

Myth: No one is making grants anymore.

Reality: Historical trends favor more grants not fewer.

 

The Myth of Scarcity

 

Most grant seekers recoil at the prospect that the grant well ever will run dry. Underlying the Myth of Scarcity are grant seekers’ anxieties and misperceptions about the degree to which grants will continue to be available when they want to seek them. One variant of the myth appears as: ‘Since the markets soured no one is making grants anymore.’  A second variant occurs as: ‘Since the government’s budget was cut back, it’s pointless to try to win a grant.’

 

Scarcity Myth Graphic

 

The Myth of Scarcity obscures several realities in grant seeking.

 

One reality relates to the year-over-year total value and growth trends of foundation assets. In any given year, lesser total amounts of grants may be awarded if the preceding year’s returns on the investment of foundation assets shrink or if donors contribute less to the many grant-making foundations. Both phenomena commonly occur during economic downturns.

 

A second reality relates to legislation. Grants become harder to find if local, state, or national legislators zero-fund or rescind particular grant programs. A zero-funded program is one that a law authorizes but for which legislators appropriate no funds. A rescinded program is one that an earlier law has authorized but a later law has ended its authorization. Finally, grants also become harder to find if legislators simply cease to authorize new grant programs.

 

Private foundations will continue to make grants each year for so long as they wish to operate as such and to maintain their status as nonprofit philanthropies. And governments will continue to make grants for so long as legislators appropriate funds for grant-making programs.

 

The next post in this series on Myths in Grant Seeking will address the flip side of the Myth of Scarcity, which is the Myth of Abundance.

Myth: Only grant brokers know where all the grants are.

Reality: Information about grants is available to anyone.

 

Myth of Abundance

 

The Myth of Abundance, like its sororal twin, the Myth of Scarcity, reflects grant seekers’ anxieties and misperceptions about the degree to which grants will continue to be available when they want to seek them. Its adherents adopt an overly optimistic stance, while adherents of its twin, the Myth of Scarcity, adopt an overly pessimistic one.

 

Abundance Myth Graphic

 

One variant of the Myth of Abundance surfaces as: ‘Every year billions upon billions of dollars of grants go unclaimed.’  A second variant turns up as: ‘We can get you a grant for anything you want to do.’  In such variants, marketers of products and services for potential grant seekers pretend to have an inside track to getting grants from grant makers.

 

In reality, information about public and private grant opportunities – and their requirements – is widely available to grant seekers and the general public. Access to it does not require the use of third-party information brokers.

 

Through its reliance on hyperbole, the Myth of Abundance obscures several grains of truth. Among such grains are long-term trend data that confirm that there are more private foundations than ever before, that they are awarding more grants than ever before, and that the total value of their grant awards is at or near its recent historic highs. In addition, long-term trend data confirm that the total value of grants made by federal agencies is much higher than in the past, even though grant-making program options may be fewer.

 

Historical trends for both public- and private-origin grants do not perfectly predict the future availability of funding from either source. Grant seekers extrapolate the historical trends indefinitely into the future only at their potential peril.

 

The next post in this series on Myths in Grant Seeking will address the Myth of Finality.

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