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Monthly Archives: May 2013

Finding funding to sustain new projects and initiatives over the long-term is a critical aspect of seeking and winning competitive grants. This post presents books about fundraising that were published in 2012. An earlier post presented similar books either planned for or published in 2013. Later posts will cover earlier years.

 

Research Method:

All of the listed books represent titles found on Amazon using the site’s ‘publication date’ sorting feature and the search term ‘fundraising.’ The search yielded 62 titles for 2012 alone. Using other sources and search terms may lead to different lists.

 

Scope of Coverage:

Although the list is subject to correction and revision, it is not intended to be exhaustive. It does not list books from before or after 2012; such books are the topics of other posts. Inclusion of a book here is not an endorsement nor does it necessarily mean I have read it. The list strives to include books that contribute to understanding practices in fundraising — and related topics, including grant writing — and to minimize its inclusion of other kinds of books.

 

Published in 2012:

  • Abdalhakim-Douglas, Amal. (2012). Seven Secrets of Successful Fundraising: A Handbook for the Professional Fundraiser.
  • Alvin, Callie. (2012). How to Organize a Scrapbooking Fundraiser.
  • Andresen, Katya. (2012). Best Practices for Fundraising Success: Diversifying Giving Channels.
  • Anthony, David. (2012). Get Set Go Fundraising.
  • Atchison, Gabriel and Quinlan, Jae. (2012). Building the Dream: Creative Fundraising for Churches.
  • Axelrod, Terry. (2012). The Benevon Model for Sustainable Fundraising: A Step-by-Step Guide to Getting it Right.
  • Barrett, Sarah. (2012). A Mom’s Guide to School Fundraising.
  • Best, Brin. (2012). Cost Effective Fundraising for Schools.
  • Boles, Blake. (2012). The Unschool Adventures Guide to Online Travel Fundraising.
  • Brooks, Jeff. (2012). The Fundraiser’s Guide to Irresistible Communications.
  • Bullock, Kirsten. (2012). Simple Steps for Growing Your Donors.
  • Carter, Jesse L. (2012). Fundraising Your Way: How to Conduct and Effective and Profitable Product Fundraiser.
  • Cliff, Marte. (2012). A Fundraising Primer for Cash-Strapped Nonprofits.
  • Copland, Craig. (2012). Fundraising for Conservatives.
  • Crouter, Fred. (2012). Make Money with Fundraising Meals.
  • Davis, Emily. (2012). Fundraising and the Next Generation.
  • Dillon, William P. (2012). People Raising: A Practical Guide to Raising Funds.
  • Doolin, Janet.(2012). Endowment 101.
  • Dustin, Jill C. (2012). Grant Writing and Fundraising Tool Kit for Human Services.
  • Eisenstein, Amy. (2012). Raising More with Less: An Essential Fundraising Guide for Nonprofit Professionals and Board Members.
  • Elkins, Kelly (2012). 150+ Great Fundraising Ideas.
  • Faire, Shane D.(2012).Fundraising Banquet Boot Camp: A Survival Guide and System for Ordinary People Seeking Extraordinary Results.
  • Fishman, Stephen, and Barrett, Ronald J. (2012). Nonprofit Fundraising Registration: The 50-State Guide.
  • Fredricks, Laura and Hart, Vanessa. (2012). The Ask.
  • Garecht, Joe. (2012). The Non-Profit Fundraising Formula.
  • Gasman, Marybeth, and Bowman, Nelson. (2012). Fundraising at Historically Black Colleges and Universities.
  • George, Simon. (2012). Raising Funds from Grant Makers.
  • Hanberg, Erik. (2012). The Little Book of Gold: Fundraising for Small and Very Small Nonprofits.
  • Hasler, Tom. (2012). Simple Effective Fundraising: A Fundraising Guide for All Charities.
  • Helweg, Richard. (2012). 199 Fun and Effective Fundraising Events for Non-Profit Organizations.
  • Herbst, Nina Botting and Norton, Michael. (2012). The Complete Fundraising Handbook.
  • Hogan, Pam. (2012). Fundraising without Fundraisers: A Nonprofit Step-by-Step Guide to Generating Revenue Using Untraditional Methods.
  • Johnson, J. Terry and Benton, Andrew. (2012). 10 Critical Factors in Fundraising: The Little Green Book for Chief Executive Officers.
  • Keeys, Anisha Robinson. (2012). 51 Retailers Who Can Help Your Nonprofit Raise Money.
  • Kelley, David J. (2012). Sports Fundraising: Dynamic Methods for Schools, Universities, and Youth Sports Organizations.
  • Kelly, Kathleen. (2012). Effective Fundraising Management.
  • Kihlstedt, Andrea. (2012). Asking Styles: Harness Your Personal Fundraising Power.
  • Klein, Catharine, et al. (2012). Healthy and Sustainable Fundraising Activities: Mobilizing Your Community Toward Social Responsibility.
  • Klingaman, Steve. (2012). Fundraising Strategies for Community Colleges: The Definitive Guide for Advancement.
  • Kraemer, Rick and Kraemer, Becky. (2012). Concession Stand Fundraising.
  • Lane, Chad. (2012). Micro-Fundraising: Raising Up to $20,000 with No Money and No Time.
  • Leonard, Richard. (2012). Fundraising for Sport and Athletics.
  • Lysakowski, Linda. (2012). Fundraising for the Genius.
  • McLinden, Jeff. (2012). The Successful Development Director.
  • Morton, Valerie. (2012). Corporate Fundraising.
  • Panas, Jerold. (2012). Born to Raise: What Makes a Great Fundraiser, What Makes a Fundraiser Great.
  • Pitman, Mark. (2012). Ask Without Fear for Librarians.
  • Quinn, Amy. (2012). Fundraising Innovators: Leaders in Social Enterprise Share New Approaches to Raising Money.
  • Reynolds, Kimberly. (2012). Fundraising Success.
  • Robinson, Paige. (2012). 250+ Fundraising Ideas for Your Charity, Society, School and PTA.
  • Rosen, Rudolph A., Cundiff, Katie Dobson, and Sansom, Andrew. (2012). Money for the Cause: A Complete Guide to Event Fundraising.
  • Sagrestano, Brian M., Wahlers, Robert E., and Fredricks, Laura. (2012). The Philanthropic Planning Companion: The Fundraiser’s and Professional Advisor’s Guide to Charitable Gift Planning.
  • Shaw, Pearl D. and Shaw, Melvin B. (2012). The Fundraiser’s Guide to Soliciting Gifts.
  • Turner, Brian. (2012). Fundraising for Volunteers: Including the One Secret Key to Fundraising Success.
  • Tzue, Alyce, and Hong, Billy. (2012). The Book on Fundraising.
  • Young, Bill. (2012). How Good Board Members Become Great Fundraisers.
  • Young, Karen L. (2012). 101 Fundraising Ideas.
  • Young, Karen L. (2012). Fundraising Primer.
  • Young, Karen L. (2012). Fundraising Workbook for Interns.
  • Walker, Julia. (2012). A Fundraising Guide for Nonprofit Board Members.
  • Weinstein, Stanley. (2012). Fundraising Essentials e-Book Set: Strategies and Tools to Raise Money.
  • Williams, Gaylyn R. and Williams, Ken. (2012). Never Do Fundraising Again: A Paradigm Shift from Donors to Lifelong Partners.

 

If you know of other titles that fit the search parameters here, please send a ‘comment’.

Finding grant sources is a critical aspect of competitive grantsmanship. This post presents books about fundraising that were published in 2013 or are forthcoming for later in 2013. Later posts will present books for earlier years.

 

Research Method:

Most of the listed books represent titles found on Amazon using the site’s ‘publication date’ sorting feature and the search term of ‘fundraising.’ The searches yielded 28 titles for so far in 2013 and 8 titles forthcoming later in 2013. Interestingly, three authors accounted for 11 (or 30.5%) of the 36 titles found.

 

It is likely that the use of other sources and search terms would have led to different lists. If you are aware of other titles that fit the search parameters, please send a ‘comment’.

 

Scope of Coverage:

Although the list is subject to correction and revision, it is not intended to be exhaustive. It does not list books from before 2013; such books will be the topics of other posts. Inclusion of a book here is not an endorsement nor does it necessarily mean I have read it. The list strives to include books that contribute to understanding practices in fundraising — and related topics, including grant writing — and to minimize its inclusion of other kinds of books.

 

Forthcoming Books in 2013:

  • Bray, Ilona. (2013). Effective Fundraising for Nonprofits: Real-World Strategies That Work.
  • Polivy, Deborah Kaplan. (2013). Donor Cultivation and the Donor Cycle Life Map + Website: A New Framework for Fundraising.
  • Stevenson, Scott C. (2013). 63 Winning Fundraising Strategies: Terrific Ideas for Meeting Your Goal.
  • Stevenson, Scott C. (2013). Fundraising for Beginners: Essential Procedures for Getting a Fundraising Program Up and Running.
  • Stevenson, Scott C. (2013). Fundraising for Libraries: How to Plan Profitable Special Events.
  • Stevenson, Scott C. (2013). Fundraising Strategies for the Small Shop.
  • Stevenson, Scott C. (2013). The Operational Plan: How to Plan Your Fundraising Year.
  • Warwick, Mal. (2013). How to Write Successful Fundraising Appeals.

 

Published in 2013:

  • Block, Jean. (2013). Fundraising: 180+ Great Ideas to Raise More Money.
  • Cagney, Penelope and Ross, Bernard. (2013). Global Fundraising: How the World is Changing the Rules of Philanthropy.
  • Davis, Mark Peter.(2013). The Fundraising Rules.
  • Garecht, Joe. (2013). Raising Money without Going Crazy: The Basics of Non-profit Fundraising.
  • Gasman, Marybeth and Bowman III, Nelson. (2013). Engaging Diverse College Alumni: The Essential Guide to Fundraising.
  • Grace, Kay Sprinkel. (2013). Beyond Fundraising: New Strategies for Nonprofit Innovation and Investment. 2nd Edition.
  • Greenhoe, John.(2013). Opening the Door to Major Gifts: Mastering the Discovery Call.
  • Kern, Rose Marie. (2013). Fundraising Events.
  • Hepting, Bev. (2013). Not for Profit and Charities Fundraising.
  • Lafond, Charles. (2013). Fearless Church Fundraising: The Practical and Spiritual Approach to Stewardship.
  • Lansdowne, David. (2013). Fundraising Realities Every Board Member Must Face. 2nd Edition.
  • Lysakowski, Linda. (2013). Are You Ready for a Capital Campaign: Assessing Your Nonprofit’s Ability to Run a Major Fundraising Campaign.
  • Maple, Peter. (2013). Marketing Strategy for Effective Fundraising.
  • McGrath, Frank. (2013). The Complete Handbook for a Successful Fundraising Golf Tournament.
  • Owen, Gordon. (2013). Enabling Your Fundraising Strategy.
  • Owen, Gordon. (2013). Fundraising Exiting Strategy.
  • Owen, Gordon. (2013). Fundraising from Companies and Charitable Trusts/Foundations and Through the Internet.
  • Penas, Gerald. (2013). Asking: A 59=Minute Guide to Everything Board Members, Volunteers, and Staff Must Know to Secure the Gift.
  • Pettey, Janice Gow. (2013). Nonprofit Fundraising Strategy: A Guide to Ethical Decision Making and Regulation for Nonprofit Organizations.
  • Phillips, Gary. (2013). The Art of Fundraising: The Appeal, the People, the Strategies.
  • Rees, Sandy. (2013). Fundraising Buffet.
  • Rees, Sandy. (2013). The Small Nonprofit’s Guide to Getting Big Gifts.
  • Rees, Sandy. (2013). The Small Nonprofit’s Guide to Raising Money Online.
  • Shaw, Douglas. (2013). The Rules of Fundraising.
  • Shaw, Melvin B. and Shaw, Pearl D. (2013). Prerequisites for Fundraising Success.
  • Stevenson, Scott C. (2013). Online Fundraising Essentials.
  • Williams, Karla A. (2013). Leading the Fundraising Charge: The Role of the Nonprofit Executive.
  • Wruck, Craig C. (2013). Planned Giving in a Nutshell. 4th Edition.

 

 

 

There may be many more networks of grant writers than those having websites, but it’s hard to verify their existence remotely without one. This post is the last in a series; it surveys the online presence of networks of grant writers across the United States of America. Earlier posts examined the purposes and benefits of such networks and outlined some considerations for starting up a local network of grant writers.

 

Overview of Grant Writers Networks:

In the summary table below, Y (Yes) means that evidence of an attribute was found on a network’s website; N (No) means that it was not found there; and a — (dash) means that the evidence was inconclusive. Note: At the end of the post a list aligns Columns 1-15 with the networks’ names and embedded website links.

 

Out of 15 networks, 15 (or 100%) had websites of varying coverage; 10 (or 67%) stated the year or date when the network was first established; 9 (or 60%) gave a mission statement; 8 (or 53%) gave a purpose (or goals) statement; 9 (or 60%) stated which types of professionals participated in the network; and 5 (or 33%) stated that membership was open to anyone who was interested.

 

Grant Writers Networks in the US

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

Website

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Date Established

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

N

Y

N

Mission Statement

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

N

Y

Y

Y

N

Purpose Statement

N

N

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

Y

N

Y

N

N

Y

Membership Types 

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

N

N

N

N

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Open Membership

N

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

N

N

Y

N

N

 

Date of Establishment:

Of the 10 networks of grant writers about which it was possible to learn when they were established, half (or 50%) were established in 2010 or later; two (or 20%) were established in 2000 through 2009; and three (or 30%) were established in 1990 through 1999. The oldest one appeared to be the Puget Sound Grant Writers Association, established in 1990.

 

Geographic Distribution:

Networks of grant writers had an online presence in nine states: Florida (3), Ohio (3), Iowa (2), Wisconsin (2), California (1), Georgia (1), Michigan (1), Missouri (1), and Washington (1).

 

Network Activities:

Among the activities in which many of the 15 networks regularly engaged were:

  • Professional networking
  • Professional development
  • Providing access to education and training
  • Promoting partnerships and collaboration
  • Promoting interdisciplinary intra-university collaboration
  • Promoting collaboration and support among peers
  • Promoting collaboration among nonprofits
  • Fostering connections among grant seekers, nonprofits, and funders,
  • Providing tools for problem solving among grant seekers
  • Sharing resources among network participants
  • Connecting grant seekers to resources
  • Enhancing participants’ writing skills
  • Assisting participants in identifying resources

 

The Grant Writers Roundtable (Grand Rapids, MI) holds its meetings at a different location each month — mostly at nonprofit organizations — so that its members can learn more about them.

 

The Puget Sound Grant Writers Association (Seattle, WA) holds an annual fall conference attended by as many as 400 persons. It also holds an annual funders forum and conducts informal grants cafés to foster networking.

 

The University of Missouri Office of Research Grant Writer Network (Columbia, MO) has published a reference book for faculty in institutions of higher education titled, Grant Seeking in Higher Education: Strategies and Tools for College Faculty (2012).

 

Table Reference List with Dates of Inception:

The names of networks of grant writers are listed in alphabetical order. The numbers correspond to the table summarizing selected attributes. The parenthetic dates are the apparent years of inception of each network; NA indicates ‘Not Available’.

 

If you know of another network of grant writers — operating in the United States of America and missing from this list — please submit a comment! 

 

Finding grant sources is a critical aspect of competitive grantsmanship. This post presents books about prospect research — in the context of fundraising and grant seeking — that were published in 2010 and earlier years. Earlier posts presented books on the same topic that were published in 2011, 2012, or 2013.

 

Research Method:

Most of the listed books represent titles found among the first 100 pages of hits on Amazon using the site’s ‘relevant’ sorting feature and the search terms of ‘prospect research’ and ‘finding funding.’ The searches yielded 7 titles for 2010 and 8 titles for the period 2006-2009. Interestingly, only one of the 15 titles from this period (2006-2010) restricts its coverage to ‘prospect research’ as such.

 

It is likely that the use of other sources and search terms would have led to different lists. If you are aware of other titles that fit the search parameters, please send a ‘comment’.

 

Scope of Coverage:

 

Although the list is subject to correction and revision, it is not intended to be exhaustive. It does not list books from before 2006 or after 2010; such books were the topics of other posts. Inclusion of a book here is not an endorsement nor does it necessarily mean I have read it. The list strives to include books that contribute to understanding practices in prospect research and related topics, and to minimize its inclusion of other kinds of books.

 

Published in 2010:

  • Bray, Ilona. (2010). Effective Fundraising for Nonprofits: Real-World Strategies that Work.
  • Connors, Bill. (2010). Fundraising with the Raiser’s Edge: A Non-Technical Guide.
  • DeWitt, Brydon M. (2010). The Nonprofit Development Companion: A Workbook for Fundraising Success.
  • Fredericks, Laura. (2010). The Ask: How to Ask for Support for Your Nonprofit Cause, Creative Project, or Business Venture.
  • Schofield, Curtis R., Fryga, Anne, and Williams, Larry, (2010). Finding and Funding Your Dream: Ten Essentials for Effective Fundraising.
  • Sargeant, Adrian, and Shang, Jen. (2010). Fundraising Principles and Practice.
  • Tempel, Eugene R. et al. (2010). Achieving Excellence in Fundraising.

 

Published in 2009:

  • Kihlstedt, Andrea. (2009). Capital Campaigns: Strategies that Work.
  • Weinstein, Stanley. (2009). The Complete Guide to Fundraising Management.

 

Published in 2008:

  • Birkholz, Joshua M. (2008). Fundraising Analytics: Using Data to Guide Strategy.
  • Bush, Emma Jean (2008). Grant Writing Road Map: A Fresh Approach to Winning Grant Funding.
  • Ciconte, Barbara and Jacob, Jeanne. (2008). Fundraising Basics: A Complete Guide.
  • Hogan, Cecilia. (2008). Prospect Research: A Primer for Growing Nonprofits.  2nd Edition.

 

Published in 2007:

  • Brewer, Ernest W. and Achilles, Charles. (2007). Funding Funding: Grantwriting from Start to Finish, Including Project Management and Internet Use.

 

Published in 2006:

Hart, Ted et al. (2006). Major Donors: Finding Big Gifts in Your Database and Online.

 

Finding grant sources is a critical aspect of competitive grantsmanship. This post presents books about prospect research — in the context of fundraising and grant seeking — that were published in 2011 and 2012. Later posts will present books on the same topic that were published in 2010 or earlier years.

 

Research Method:

Most of the listed books represent titles found among the first 100 pages of hits on Amazon using the site’s publishing date sorting feature and the search terms of ‘prospect research’ and ‘finding funding.’ The searches yielded 7 titles for 2012 and 6 titles for 2011. Interestingly, only one of these 13 titles restricts its coverage to prospect research as such.

 

It is likely that the use of other sources and search terms would have led to different lists. If you are aware of other titles that fit the search parameters, please send a ‘comment’.

 

Scope of Coverage:

Although the list is subject to correction and revision, it is not intended to be exhaustive. Unless they were published in new editions, it does not list books from before 2011 or after 2012; such books will be the topics of other posts. Inclusion of a book here is not an endorsement nor does it necessarily mean I have read it. The list strives to include books only about prospect research and related topics, and to minimize its inclusion of other kinds of books.

 

Published in 2012:

  • Andresen, Katya. (2012). Best Practices for Fundraising Success: Diversifying Giving Channels.
  • Bullock, Kirsten M. (2012). Simple Steps to Growing Your Donors.
  • Hunt, Penelope C. and Lippincott, John. (2012). Development for Academic Leaders: A Practical Guide for Fundraising Success.
  • Licklider, Mary M. et al. (2012). Grant Seeking in Higher Education: Strategies and Tools for College Faculty.
  • Lysakowsi, Lisa. (2012). Fundraising for the Genius: The Only Book You’ll Ever Need to Raise More Money for Your Nonprofit Organization.
  • Quinn, Amy S. (2012). Fundraising Innovators: Leaders in Social Enterprise Share New Approaches to Raising Money.
  • Walker, Julia I. (2012). A Fundraising Guide for Nonprofit Board Members.

 

Published in 2011:

  • Cannon, Christopher M. (2011). An Executive’s Guide to Fundraising Operations: Principles, Tools, and Trends.
  • Drezner, Noah D. (2011). Philanthropy and Fundraising in American Higher Education.
  • Hancks, Meredith L. (2011). Getting Started in Prospect Research: What You Need to Know to Find Who You Need to Find.
  • Jones, Robin and Funnell, Rebecca. (2011). Prospect Research.
  • Kim, Peter, Perrault, Gail, and Foster, William. (2011). Finding Your Funding Model: A Practical Approach to Nonprofit Sustainability.
  • Stroman, M. Kent. (2011). Asking About Asking: Mastering the Art of Conversational Fundraising. 

 

Finding grant sources is a critical aspect of competitive grantsmanship. This post presents books about prospect research published to date in 2013. Later posts will present books published in 2010, 2011, and 2012, and perhaps also in earlier years.

 

Research Method:

Most of the listed books represent titles found among the first 30 pages of hits on Amazon using the search terms ‘prospect research’ and ‘finding funding.’ The searches yielded 12 titles so far for 2013.

 

It is likely that the use of other sources and search terms would have led to different lists. If you are aware of other titles that fit the search parameters, please send a ‘comment’.

 

Scope of Coverage:

Although the list is subject to correction and revision, it is not intended to be exhaustive. Unless they were published in new editions, it does not list books from years before 2013; many such books will be the topics of later posts. Inclusion of a book here is not an endorsement nor does it necessarily mean I have read it. The list strives to include books only about prospect research and related topics, and to minimize its inclusion of other kinds of books.

 

Published in 2013:

  • Cagney, Penelope, and Ross, Bernard. (2013). Global Fundraising: How the World is Changing the Rules of Philanthropy.
  • Dolhopf-Brown, Elizabeth. (2013). Prospect Research Fundamentals: Prove Methods to Help Charities Realize More Major Gifts.
  • Filla, Jennifer J. and Brown, Helen E. (2013). Prospect Research for Fundraisers: The Essential Handbook.
  • Grace, Kay Sprinkel. (2013). Beyond Fundraising: New Strategies for Nonprofit Innovation and Investment Fund Development. 2nd Edition.
  • Greenhoe, John. (2013). Opening the Door to Major Gifts: Mastering the Discovery Call.
  • Hancks, Meredith L. and Rosson, Cara. (2013). Prospect Research is a Verb: Fundraising is the Subject.
  • Harris, Kim. (2013). How to Write a Program Grant Proposal: Nonprofit Guide to Writing Successful Grant Proposals.
  • Lansdowne, David. (2013). Fundraising Realities Every Board Member Must Face: A 1-Hour Crash Course on Raising Major Gifts. 2nd Edition.
  • Quinn, Laura. (2013). The Idealware Field Guide to Software for Nonprofits 2013.
  • Pettey, Janet Gow. (2013). Nonprofit Fundraising Strategy: A Guide to Ethical Decision-Making and Regulation for Nonprofit Organizations.
  • Williams, Karla A. (2013). Leading the Fundraising Charge: The Role of the Nonprofit Executive.
  • Wruck, Craig C. (2013). Planned Giving in a Nutshell: Planned Giving on Your Terms. 4th Edition.

 

Networks can be powerful tools for organizations seeking competitively awarded grants.

 

This post is the second in a series; it focuses on procedures for a new network of grant writers in terms of why, who, what, where, when, and how. An earlier post focused on the purposes and benefits of networks. Later posts will survey existing networks of grant seeking organizations.

 

Background:

The Tulsa Area Grant Writers Network (TAG-Net) was an informal initiative that lasted about 10 years. Its purpose was to building local to win more grants, particularly in programs that required partnerships. Its membership was open to professionals who wrote competitive grant proposals and/or managed grant-funded projects. Members met monthly. Meetings had agendas and lasted an hour or so. Different organizations hosted the meetings at their facilities.

 

Why:

This question involves the reasons for starting a grant writer’s network. One reason is to win more grants for the communities and constituencies represented by the network’s members:

  • Circulate a declaration of purpose, rationale, and goals
  • Focus on partnership building and collaboration in seeking competitive grants

 

Who:

This question defines the intended membership of the network. One point of departure is professionals who write competitive grant proposals:

  • Invite counterparts who are engaged in grant seeking in area organizations
  • Rotate leadership of meetings among network members
  • Exchange contact information
  • Compile and share a membership directory
  • Collect and report meeting attendance data to members

 

What:

This question refines the tasks of a grant writer’s network. One fundamental task is to provide information and insights that lead to more effective partnerships and more grant awards.

  • Request members’ inputs for agenda topics and themes
  • Incorporate members’ inputs in establishing agendas
  • Publish and follow an agenda for each meeting

 

Where:

This question establishes the network’s ownership and visibility. One aspect is ensuring that it not be seen as belonging to or benefitting only one grant seeking organization:

  • Meet at varied locations – to maximize ownership among organizations
  • Meet at varied locations – to expose members to members’ facilities and staff

 

When:

This question requires committing enough time to make a network useful for its members. One aspect is calibrating time allocations to members’ priorities and availability.

  • Hold regular meetings at predictable times – biweekly to monthly
  • Dedicate an hour or more to holding the actual meetings
  • Hold additional ad hoc meetings as grants opportunities arise

 

How:

This question entails basic assumptions about forming and operating new collaborative networks of grant writers. They reflect a singular intention to use the network as a means for building capacity for seeking and winning competitive grants.

 

Particularly at the start, it seems prudent to avoid over-formalizing the network:

  • No website
  • No 501(c)(3)
  • No dues
  • No budget
  • No elected officers
  • No single-site affiliation

 

With time, it is likely that active members may desire to formalize the network in some way. It’s then up to the members to determine how they wish to proceed. A later post will explore what other networks have done with particular attention to their apparent formality of approach.

 

Networks can be powerful tools for organizations seeking competitively awarded grants.

 

This post is the first in a series; its focuses are the purposes and benefits of grant writers’ networks. Later posts will survey existing networks of grant seeking organizations and will explore possible ways to set up and operate a new network.

 

Background:

As a full-time grant writer for a large urban school district, I launched the Tulsa Area Grant Writers Network (TAG-Net) by using a business card collection as my source of initial contacts. From the start it was designed to be a collaborative effort. Its primary rationale was to respond to an escalating need for applicants to be able to have robust partnerships in place when competing for new grants.

 

During its first five years, I was the nominal chairperson of TAG-Net during which time it expanded to involve 80 participants from 65 grant seeking organizations in the metro area. In varying formats, TAG-Net continued to operate for another five years after I had accepted a position in a different organization and could no longer participate in it.

 

Purposes of Networks:

Creating and sustaining a network of grant writers serves a number of capacity-building purposes for its participants, all of which can contribute to positioning them to win grants. Among such purposes are to:

  • Maximize eligibility as applicants
  • Catalyze the building of partnerships
  • Facilitate planning of partnership proposals
  • Share data (with protections of privacy and confidentiality intact)
  • Exchange and share effective practices
  • Exchange and share knowledge and expertise
  • Exchange information about coming grant deadlines
  • Leverage existing community resources and assets
  • Provide professional development for participants

 

Benefits of Networks:

Actively engaging in a network of grant writers can generate a number of definable and measurable benefits for its participants, among which are that they:

  • Become more familiar with modes of operation of diverse participant organizations
  • Become more familiar with varying executive sign-off protocols of other organizations
  • Become more familiar with who does what in other participant organizations
  • Expedite obtaining memoranda of agreement and letters of commitment or support
  • Make it easier to identify potential project staff and potential external consultants
  • Create the competitive asset of pre-existing collaboration and partnerships

 

In addition, through actively engaging in a network, grant writers can:

  • Learn what types of data other organizations collect and maintain (but may not report)
  • Engage in more extensive sharing of data for developing assessments of need
  • Acquire more ready access to resources for specialized reviews of research literature
  • Mitigate the potentially adverse effects of turf and silo mentalities
  • Win more grants to support worthwhile local projects and initiatives

 

 

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