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In May 2011, the United States Department of Education (USDE) adopted a final set of Supplemental Priorities for Discretionary Grant Programs. Applicants for USDE grants must consider these along with the more familiar absolute, competitive, and invitational priorities that grant seekers often encounter in USDE solicitations of proposals. The 16 supplemental priorities encompass a total of 50 specific priority areas that may be used for USDE discretionary grant programs.

 

Supplemental Priorities:

The supplemental priorities for USDE discretionary grant programs are intended to spur innovation, promote development and implementation of effective and sustainable practices, and support adoption and implementation of necessary reforms. The USDE may use one or more supplemental priorities in any of its discretionary grant competitions, as appropriate for each particular discretionary grant program.

 

Stones

 

This post offers a brief overview of the supplemental priorities in the two focus areas of Addressing the Needs of Student Subgroups and Building Capacity for Continuous Systemic Improvement. Within these two focus areas are eight supplemental priorities (four per focus area). The 21 priority areas within these eight supplemental priorities exert significant effects on an organization’s go/no-go decisions about submitting proposals and, subsequently, on creating program designs and framing project objectives.

 

An earlier post examined a third focus area encompassing eight more supplemental priorities and 29 more priority areas that also may be used for USDE discretionary grant programs. Still later posts will explore the possible implications of all 16 supplemental priorities and of all 50 priority areas for planning new competitive applications for USDE grant awards.

 

Addressing Needs of Student Subgroups:

The four priorities for Addressing the Needs of Student Subgroups are: (9) Improving Achievement and High School Graduation Rates; (10) Promoting Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education; (11) Promoting Diversity; and (12) Support for Military Families. The priorities in this focus area encompass a total of 13 priority areas. [Note the numbering of priorities preserves that of the Final Notice of Supplemental Priorities.]

 

Addressing Needs of Student Subgroups

Priority

Focus of Priority

Priority Areas

Priority 9

Improving Achievement and High School Graduation Rates

6

Priority 10

Promoting Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education

5

Priority 11

Promoting Diversity

1

Priority 12

Support for Military Families

1

 

Building Capacity for Systemic Continuous Improvement:

The four priorities for Building Capacity for Continuous Systemic Improvement are: (13) Enabling More Data-Based Decision-Making; (14) Building Evidence of Effectiveness; (15) Supporting Programs, Practices, or Strategies for which there is Strong or Moderate Evidence of Effectiveness; and (16) Improving Productivity. The priorities in this focus area encompass a total of eight priority areas. [Note the numbering of priorities preserves that of the Final Notice of Supplemental Priorities.]

 

Building Capacity for Systemic Continuous Improvement

Priority

Focus of Priority

Priority Areas

Priority 13

Improving Achievement and High School Graduation Rates

4

Priority 14

Building Evidence of Effectiveness

2

Priority 15

Supporting Programs, Practices, or Strategies for which there is Strong or Moderate Evidence of Effectiveness

1

Priority 16

Improving Productivity

1

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  1. […] How to Win a Grant: Supplemental Priorities Part II (grantresults.wordpress.com) […]

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