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Every grant seeker must carefully consider its options when it plans how it will collect data throughout a proposed project or initiative. Each data collection method has immediate consequences for budgets, personnel, and other aspects of the undertaking.

 

An earlier post discussed three approaches to data collection: self-reports, observation checklists, and standardized tests. This post will discuss three more: interviews, surveys/questionnaires, and reviews of existing records.

 

Interviews:

  1. How important is it to know the service recipient’s perspective?
  2. Do the interview questions already exist or must they be created?
  3. Who will create the questions and vet their suitability to intended purposes?
  4. How will the applicant ensure accurate recording of responses to interview questions?
  5. Will interviews be used together with a survey or separately?
  6. Are enough persons available to conduct the interviews?
  7. How often will interviews occur and who will be interviewed?
  8. Will interviews be in English or in other languages as well?
  9. Who will translate the interviews and ensure accuracy of the translations?

 

Surveys or Questionnaires:

  1. How important is it to know the service recipient’s perspective?
  2. How will you control for inaccurate or misleading survey responses?
  3. Does the survey already exist or must it be created?
  4. Who will create the survey and vet its suitability to intended purposes?
  5. Will the survey be all forced-choice responses or will it include open-ended prompts?
  6. Will the survey be self-administered?
  7. Who will complete the surveys?
  8. Who will collect completed surveys?
  9. Will the survey be in English or in other languages as well?
  10. Who will translate the survey responses and ensure accuracy of the translations?

 

Reviews of Existing Records:

  1. Are the records internal to the applicant organization?
  2. Are the records external (i.e., found in other organizations, such as partners)?
  3. Will the external organizations (or partners) agree to the use of their records?
  4. Who will determine whether the records are timely and relevant?
  5. Are the records quickly, easily, and readily accessible?
  6. Are the records formal and official?
  7. Are the records maintained consistently and regularly?
  8. Are the records reliable?
  9. Are protocols in place to protect and preserve privacy and confidentiality?
  10. How will the applicant ensure that existing protocols are followed?
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