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As a proposal writer, as you sort through your options for how an applicant will collect data during the lifespan of a proposed project or initiative, it will help if you consider:

  1. What kinds of data does the applicant need?
  2. Must the data be quantitative?
  3. Must the data be standardized?
  4. Must the data be reliable?
  5. Must the data be valid?
  6. Do the data already exist? If so, where?
  7. Does a data collection instrument already exist? If so, is it usable as-is?

 

For a given type of data – to be analyzed with a given desired or required level of rigor – the best choices of data collection methods often prove also to be the simplest, least expensive, and most direct.

 

Among the most commonly used data collection methods are: self-reports, observation checklists, standardized tests, interviews, surveys, and reviews of existing records. This post will cover the first three methods. A later post will cover the others.

 

Self-Reports:

  1. Are there questions whose responses could be used to assess a given indicator?
  2. Does a self-report provide sufficiently objective and accurate data?
  3. Will a self-report be sufficiently reliable (e.g., stable over time)?
  4. Are adequate safeguards in place to protect privacy and confidentiality?

 

Observation Checklists:

  1. Is the expected change readily observed (such as a skill or a condition)?
  2. Will using the checklist require trained observers?
  3. Are enough already trained persons available to observe events and behaviors?
  4. Can volunteers be trained and deployed as observers?
  5. Can trained observers measure the indicator without also asking questions?
  6. Are adequate safeguards in place to protect privacy and confidentiality?

 

Standardized Tests:

  1. Is the expected change related to knowledge or a skill?
  2. Is the knowledge or skill something that is already tested?
  3. What are the technical attributes of the tests already used?
  4. Can a pre-existing test be used or must a new one be created?
  5. If a new one is needed, how will its validity and reliability be verified?
  6. Can the same test be used with all test-takers?
  7. Must special accommodations be made for some test-takers?
  8. Must the applicant administer the test or do others administer it?
  9. Do others already statistically analyze the test results or must the applicant?
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