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Data are critical to the success of a grant proposal. In addition, data are critical to the success of a funded project or initiative. Although data may be qualitative as well as quantitative, major funders tend to look for plans to generate quantitative data. While designing a data collection plan, smart grant seekers will ask how (strategies) and how often (frequencies).

 

Data Collection Strategies:

In creating a plan, consider the best ways to capture each performance indicator. Since the changes in conditions or behaviors that each indicator will measure may be subtle, incremental, or gradual, each indicator will need to be sensitive enough both to detect the changes to be measured and to determine their significance.

 

Data Collection Frequency:

In addition, consider what frequency will furnish the most useful data for monitoring and measuring expected changes. Typical frequencies are daily, monthly, quarterly, and yearly. Be certain to differentiate between outputs and outcomes, since outputs often require considerably less time to be observable and measurable than do outcomes.

 

In planning for data collection, smart grant seekers will ensure that:

  1. Collecting data neither usurps nor impedes delivery of direct services
  2. Staff rigorously protect and preserve the privacy and confidentiality of data
  3. Data collection methods are time-efficient and cost-effective
  4. Data collection activities strictly observe human research standards and protocols
  5. A neutral third party evaluates and reports the collected data

 

Data Collection Caveats:

In considering the nature and uses of the data to be collected, be mindful that:

  1. Data should be aggregated and analyzed to reflect the total population served
  2. Findings should be limited to a specific project or initiative
  3. Findings should be limited to a specific population of intended beneficiaries
  4. Cause and effect claims require much more rigorous evidence than associative claims

 

A later post in this series will discuss data collection methods.

 

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